14 Aug 2007 10:03:10
EdV
Nordic Running Pole Plant Question/Observation

Yeah, it's me again. I am still enjoying my slow running with the
poles. Sunday I had a goal of "run or more than an hour" which was
much easier than I had thought it would be because it was in the '70s

While running I tried planting "further behind" so as to have some
push while a foot was in the air and moving forward. Felt much nicer
all around, from hand and wrist fatigue to leg fatigue. Shaved my 13
minute mile pace to sub 12 minute mile. Woo hoo. . .I'm flying.

Any thoughts on pole plant appreciated.

Thanks,
Ed V.



16 Aug 2007 15:07:22
tassava
Re: Nordic Running Pole Plant Question/Observation

Ed -

I went out for a longish run with poles and studied my pole placement.
By and large, I planted my pole at a spot about equal with the
opposite foot's heel. Oddly enough, my left pole/right foot was almost
always like this, but the right pole/left foot drifting forward and
back from about the ball of the foot to well behind the heel - perhaps
due to better right arm strength? Concentrating on putting the pole
down with a sharp, quick motion and on following through seemed to pay
off with a bit of burn in the bicep and tricep. I'm still looking for
a way to get my abdominals involved; it's much easier to feel them
engage when rollerskiing. Any tips from any more-experienced skiers?

Christopher

On Aug 14, 12:03 pm, EdV <ed_vo...@my-deja.com > wrote:
> Yeah, it's me again. I am still enjoying my slow running with the
> poles. Sunday I had a goal of "run or more than an hour" which was
> much easier than I had thought it would be because it was in the '70s
>
> While running I tried planting "further behind" so as to have some
> push while a foot was in the air and moving forward. Felt much nicer
> all around, from hand and wrist fatigue to leg fatigue. Shaved my 13
> minute mile pace to sub 12 minute mile. Woo hoo. . .I'm flying.
>
> Any thoughts on pole plant appreciated.
>
> Thanks,
> Ed V.




16 Aug 2007 17:48:04
Re: Nordic Running Pole Plant Question/Observation

Don't expect much out of abs except a bit with bounding. When going up
hill on classical skis it helps to move the pole timing forward in the
cycle, which among other things accentuates the ab crunch and use of
upper torso in getting a good push off, but I haven't tried that on dry
land.


tassava <google@tassava.com > wrote:

>Ed -
>
>I went out for a longish run with poles and studied my pole placement.
>By and large, I planted my pole at a spot about equal with the
>opposite foot's heel. Oddly enough, my left pole/right foot was almost
>always like this, but the right pole/left foot drifting forward and
>back from about the ball of the foot to well behind the heel - perhaps
>due to better right arm strength? Concentrating on putting the pole
>down with a sharp, quick motion and on following through seemed to pay
>off with a bit of burn in the bicep and tricep. I'm still looking for
>a way to get my abdominals involved; it's much easier to feel them
>engage when rollerskiing. Any tips from any more-experienced skiers?
>
>Christopher


18 Aug 2007 12:11:40
EdV
Re: Nordic Running Pole Plant Question/Observation

On Aug 16, 9:07 am, tassava <goo...@tassava.com > wrote:
> Ed -
>
> I went out for a longish run with poles and studied my pole placement.
> By and large, I planted my pole at a spot about equal with the
> opposite foot's heel. Oddly enough, my left pole/right foot was almost
> always like this, but the right pole/left foot drifting forward and
> back from about the ball of the foot to well behind the heel - perhaps
> due to better right arm strength? Concentrating on putting the pole
> down with a sharp, quick motion and on following through seemed to pay
> off with a bit of burn in the bicep and tricep. I'm still looking for
> a way to get my abdominals involved; it's much easier to feel them
> engage when rollerskiing. Any tips from any more-experienced skiers?
>
> Christopher
>
> On Aug 14, 12:03 pm, EdV <ed_vo...@my-deja.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Yeah, it's me again. I am still enjoying my slow running with the
> > poles. Sunday I had a goal of "run or more than an hour" which was
> > much easier than I had thought it would be because it was in the '70s
>
> > While running I tried planting "further behind" so as to have some
> > push while a foot was in the air and moving forward. Felt much nicer
> > all around, from hand and wrist fatigue to leg fatigue. Shaved my 13
> > minute mile pace to sub 12 minute mile. Woo hoo. . .I'm flying.
>
> > Any thoughts on pole plant appreciated.
>
> > Thanks,
> > Ed V.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I feel like I get some ab work in on the up hills. Would anyone care
to expound on the bounding technique. I have a feel for it from the
name but a video might prevent me from exciting a rotator cuff injury.

Thanks,
Ed V.



18 Aug 2007 15:28:10
Re: Nordic Running Pole Plant Question/Observation

All videos of bounding I've seen are commercial. However, these two
sites may help. In the first, note the degree of arm (and shoulder)
extension shown may occur in fast bounding but is not generally used
any more for its inefficiency re power when skiing.

http://www.ernordic.com/~ralph/04-05archive/ralpharchive2.htm
http://www.masterskier.com/articles/0102preseason/drylandtechniques.html
http://www.nensa.net/training/Technique/ClassicDryland.html



EdV <ed_vogel@my-deja.com > wrote:

>I feel like I get some ab work in on the up hills. Would anyone care
>to expound on the bounding technique. I have a feel for it from the
>name but a video might prevent me from exciting a rotator cuff injury.
>
>Thanks,
> Ed V.
>