27 May 2004 23:30:42
Dave
Longer Ball PV1 or PV1X or Callaway HXTour?

Anyone feel they have played these balls enough to know which is longer?
Mostly is pV1x longer than pV1 (since I can get those used)?
Thanks,
Dave



28 May 2004 01:18:01
Mark A
Re: Longer Ball PV1 or PV1X or Callaway HXTour?

"Dave" <dave_nonospaam@bentshaft.com > wrote in message
news:10bdn3et0mrg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
> Anyone feel they have played these balls enough to know which is longer?
> Mostly is pV1x longer than pV1 (since I can get those used)?
> Thanks,
> Dave
>
If you have a very high swing speed, the Pro V1X is slightly longer. But you
have to have a very high swing speed to realize the difference. You can see
which professionals play which ball of these 2 balls on the Titleist
website.




28 May 2004 06:53:04
David Sneddon
Re: Longer Ball PV1 or PV1X or Callaway HXTour?

Dave wrote:

> Anyone feel they have played these balls enough to know which is longer?
> Mostly is pV1x longer than pV1 (since I can get those used)?
> Thanks,
> Dave
>

If your swingspeed is over 105/110 with a driver, then the ProV1x is
longer. I found the new Callaway Black just as long if not a tad longer.

The downside is on the green where you have less "stop" than the regular
ProV1.

David



28 May 2004 11:57:12
Curious
Re: Longer Ball PV1 or PV1X or Callaway HXTour?

For me ....

HX Tour
ProV1x
ProV1



"Dave" <dave_nonospaam@bentshaft.com > wrote in message
news:10bdn3et0mrg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
> Anyone feel they have played these balls enough to know which is longer?
> Mostly is pV1x longer than pV1 (since I can get those used)?
> Thanks,
> Dave
>




28 May 2004 19:09:10
Kevin D. Timm
Re: Longer Ball PV1 or PV1X or Callaway HXTour?

David Sneddon wrote:
>
> Dave wrote:
>
> > Anyone feel they have played these balls enough to know which is longer?
> > Mostly is pV1x longer than pV1 (since I can get those used)?
> > Thanks,
> > Dave
> >
>
> If your swingspeed is over 105/110 with a driver, then the ProV1x is
> longer. I found the new Callaway Black just as long if not a tad longer.
>
> The downside is on the green where you have less "stop" than the regular
> ProV1.
>
> David

I played 90 holes this past Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday, most of them with
ProV1's. I wouldn't ever dream of paying for them, but seem to be
blessed
with a second sight where I can find them two steps into the rough at
will.

Anyway, they are magic. I bladed shots onto half a dozen greens at Tour
18
on Wednesday and stopped all but one of them, still on the green.
Magic.
Distance I don't care about, but they seem plenty long and feel good off
the club.

KT


29 May 2004 08:55:07
david s-a
Sort out your balls....(longish)


"Dave" <dave_nonospaam@bentshaft.com > wrote in message
news:10bdn3et0mrg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
> Anyone feel they have played these balls enough to know which is
longer?
> Mostly is pV1x longer than pV1 (since I can get those used)?
> Thanks,


I'm not sure where I got the following text....but where ever...I
acknowledge it is not mine! (...but enjoy anyway!)

Quote....

Sunday, October 12, 2003

Titliest Pro V1....no dot, one dot, or two dots??


Original Pro V1

Titleist had a fine ball in the Original Pro V1. It flew for very good
distances while also managing to maintain fine green holding ability at
the same time. The problem was that the Original Pro V1, as good as it
was, was still far from perfect. It had a pronounced seam and a slight
imbalance. Players soon found that they could bolster performance by
properly aligning, or "seaming", the ball. The rumor was that the
U.S.G.A. informed Titleist that the ball must be "improved" to remain
legit. It soon was. The Original Pro V1 can be recognized by the on-ball
inscription. It says, plainly and simply, "Pro V1 392 ". (The 392 stands
for the number of dimples)
Improved Pro V1
In short order, the Improved Pro V1 replaced the Original Pro V1 in all
high-volume stores. However, many boxes of the Original remained in
circulation at small, low-volume pro shops. Also, many used and
reconditioned Pro V1's that are available through various outlets are
the Original version. If given the opportunity, any player would be well
advised to make certain that they are playing the Improved version. If
nothing else, it is better balanced and will putt truer than the
Original. The Improved edition can be recognized by the dot that
separates the name from the number, as can be seen on the box above.

Pro V1 Star

The Titleist Pro V1 has indeed been a hugely successful ball. It quickly
swept through the ranks of all professional tours across the world. In
the long run, however, its performance characteristics turned out not to
be to every player's liking. For certain players, the ball climbed too
steeply and tended to spin too much. Some players had problems with the
Pro V1 reeling back off of greens. Exaggerated spinning was once in
vogue on the PGA Tour, but recent years have seen players withdraw from
the notion of hitting approach shots that reel back many yards after
landing. Such ball behavior can often be more troublesome than helpful.
Consequently, Titleist decided to release a lower flying, reduced spin
version called the Star. This ball proved popular with many players,
especially those who played more of a bump and run game. It proved to be
a bit better into the wind than its higher-spinning counterpart. Not all
players were fond of it, however. They found that it felt and played too
much like conventional balls.
The Pro V1 Star is no longer in the Titleist lineup, but it may still be
found at numerous outlets. This ball can be identified by a tiny star
between the name and the number. So small is the star that it looks like
an asterisk. For those who need reading glasses, differentiating the
centered "star" from the centered "dot" of the Improved model may be
difficult.

New Pro V1

Competition in the marketplace soon increased for the Pro V1, and in
2003, Titleist decided to improve the Pro V1 yet again. The New Pro V1
was released. It is an evolutionary refinement of the improved Pro V1
that went before it. (They should have called it the "Improved
Improved") Performance-wise, slight alterations were made to flatten
trajectories and add more initial velocity from the tee. The latest Pro
V1 is more stable into head and crosswinds.
Though not all players can detect the difference between this ball and
the Improved, the New is the Pro V1 that will perform best for the
majority of players. When paying top dollar, most players will want to
make absolutely certain that they are buying the New Pro V1. Many
smaller shops will still be carrying older versions of the Pro V1 for
quite some time to come. The New Pro V1 can be identified by the dots
and arrowheads that encase both ends of the inscribed name. At least one
major retailer refers to this ball as "Pro V1 2003".

Pro V1x

The most recent rendition of the Pro V1 is the 'X'. This ball replaces
the Star in the Titleist lineup. Its target demographic is a bit
different, however. Titleist recommends the 'X' for players who hit at
driver swing speeds of 115 or more. That rules out more than 85% of the
players out there. The Pro V1x is actually a different ball from any
other Pro V1. It has 332 dimples in seven sizes as opposed to the 392 in
five sizes on the New Pro V1. The 'X' is also a 4-piece ball that has a
much smaller, and harder core than that of the New Pro V1.
Performance-wise, the Pro V1x is different, as well. It is a harder golf
ball with a much firmer feel.
The 'X' is also designed to spin less off of all clubs. It launches
lower and will fly longer for high-speed swingers. For them it is a
"hotter" golf ball. It may be considerably shorter for low swing speed
players, however. The Pro V1x is easily identified. It's inscribed name
looks just the New Pro V1, but an 'x' is included after the name and
before the number. Also, the number under the Titleist script is in red,
not black.

Note to Higher Handicapped Players:

The Titleist Pro V1 will NOT - we repeat, will NOT - improve your golf
game. The Pro V1 is designed for better players who know how to make a
ball bite, sit or spin back. It is not intended for bump and run players
who roll the ball up to a pin. Switching to this ball will not make you
play more like a pro!

.....unquote!

cheers
david



28 May 2004 21:57:35
Pat McLean
Re: Sort out your balls....(longish)

That's from golfclubreview.com . I got a dozen found ProV's given to me and
I looked up the article to know which was which.
"david s-a" <dsantwyk@bigpond.net.au > wrote in message
news:2hpuejFfd8riU1@uni-berlin.de...
>
> "Dave" <dave_nonospaam@bentshaft.com> wrote in message
> news:10bdn3et0mrg1d8@corp.supernews.com...
> > Anyone feel they have played these balls enough to know which is
> longer?
> > Mostly is pV1x longer than pV1 (since I can get those used)?
> > Thanks,
>
>
> I'm not sure where I got the following text....but where ever...I
> acknowledge it is not mine! (...but enjoy anyway!)
>
> Quote....
>
> Sunday, October 12, 2003
>
> Titliest Pro V1....no dot, one dot, or two dots??
>
>
> Original Pro V1
>
> Titleist had a fine ball in the Original Pro V1. It flew for very good
> distances while also managing to maintain fine green holding ability at
> the same time. The problem was that the Original Pro V1, as good as it
> was, was still far from perfect. It had a pronounced seam and a slight
> imbalance. Players soon found that they could bolster performance by
> properly aligning, or "seaming", the ball. The rumor was that the
> U.S.G.A. informed Titleist that the ball must be "improved" to remain
> legit. It soon was. The Original Pro V1 can be recognized by the on-ball
> inscription. It says, plainly and simply, "Pro V1 392 ". (The 392 stands
> for the number of dimples)
> Improved Pro V1
> In short order, the Improved Pro V1 replaced the Original Pro V1 in all
> high-volume stores. However, many boxes of the Original remained in
> circulation at small, low-volume pro shops. Also, many used and
> reconditioned Pro V1's that are available through various outlets are
> the Original version. If given the opportunity, any player would be well
> advised to make certain that they are playing the Improved version. If
> nothing else, it is better balanced and will putt truer than the
> Original. The Improved edition can be recognized by the dot that
> separates the name from the number, as can be seen on the box above.
>
> Pro V1 Star
>
> The Titleist Pro V1 has indeed been a hugely successful ball. It quickly
> swept through the ranks of all professional tours across the world. In
> the long run, however, its performance characteristics turned out not to
> be to every player's liking. For certain players, the ball climbed too
> steeply and tended to spin too much. Some players had problems with the
> Pro V1 reeling back off of greens. Exaggerated spinning was once in
> vogue on the PGA Tour, but recent years have seen players withdraw from
> the notion of hitting approach shots that reel back many yards after
> landing. Such ball behavior can often be more troublesome than helpful.
> Consequently, Titleist decided to release a lower flying, reduced spin
> version called the Star. This ball proved popular with many players,
> especially those who played more of a bump and run game. It proved to be
> a bit better into the wind than its higher-spinning counterpart. Not all
> players were fond of it, however. They found that it felt and played too
> much like conventional balls.
> The Pro V1 Star is no longer in the Titleist lineup, but it may still be
> found at numerous outlets. This ball can be identified by a tiny star
> between the name and the number. So small is the star that it looks like
> an asterisk. For those who need reading glasses, differentiating the
> centered "star" from the centered "dot" of the Improved model may be
> difficult.
>
> New Pro V1
>
> Competition in the marketplace soon increased for the Pro V1, and in
> 2003, Titleist decided to improve the Pro V1 yet again. The New Pro V1
> was released. It is an evolutionary refinement of the improved Pro V1
> that went before it. (They should have called it the "Improved
> Improved") Performance-wise, slight alterations were made to flatten
> trajectories and add more initial velocity from the tee. The latest Pro
> V1 is more stable into head and crosswinds.
> Though not all players can detect the difference between this ball and
> the Improved, the New is the Pro V1 that will perform best for the
> majority of players. When paying top dollar, most players will want to
> make absolutely certain that they are buying the New Pro V1. Many
> smaller shops will still be carrying older versions of the Pro V1 for
> quite some time to come. The New Pro V1 can be identified by the dots
> and arrowheads that encase both ends of the inscribed name. At least one
> major retailer refers to this ball as "Pro V1 2003".
>
> Pro V1x
>
> The most recent rendition of the Pro V1 is the 'X'. This ball replaces
> the Star in the Titleist lineup. Its target demographic is a bit
> different, however. Titleist recommends the 'X' for players who hit at
> driver swing speeds of 115 or more. That rules out more than 85% of the
> players out there. The Pro V1x is actually a different ball from any
> other Pro V1. It has 332 dimples in seven sizes as opposed to the 392 in
> five sizes on the New Pro V1. The 'X' is also a 4-piece ball that has a
> much smaller, and harder core than that of the New Pro V1.
> Performance-wise, the Pro V1x is different, as well. It is a harder golf
> ball with a much firmer feel.
> The 'X' is also designed to spin less off of all clubs. It launches
> lower and will fly longer for high-speed swingers. For them it is a
> "hotter" golf ball. It may be considerably shorter for low swing speed
> players, however. The Pro V1x is easily identified. It's inscribed name
> looks just the New Pro V1, but an 'x' is included after the name and
> before the number. Also, the number under the Titleist script is in red,
> not black.
>
> Note to Higher Handicapped Players:
>
> The Titleist Pro V1 will NOT - we repeat, will NOT - improve your golf
> game. The Pro V1 is designed for better players who know how to make a
> ball bite, sit or spin back. It is not intended for bump and run players
> who roll the ball up to a pin. Switching to this ball will not make you
> play more like a pro!
>
> .....unquote!
>
> cheers
> david
>