13 Feb 2004 12:44:23
Jen
skating after injury

Hi everybody,

I just have a general question about returning to skating after an
injury...I am going to have my knee scoped soon to remove torn
cartilage and during the scope the surgeon may also need to repair my
ACL depending on how torn it is. (He thinks it has a bad tear but has
to scope it to see how much.)

Does anyone know if you can skate again after an ACL reconstruction?
What about single revolution jumps?

Even if my doc says I can skate again, I'm worried because I injured
my knee just doing footwork...it's not like I slammed into the boards
or anything.

I want to skate again, but I think I might feel guilty doing so, like
it's really something for the younger folks and I have no business
being out there, given the degree of injury I sustained from what I
thought at the time was a minor fall.

On the other hand, I feel like it's too soon to give up on the only
"fun" form of exercise I have found so far.

Any opinions or words of advice?

Thanks much in advance.


13 Feb 2004 21:10:08
Doris Penndorf
Re: skating after injury

Hi Jen,

Please don't be discouraged!! There is an adult skater in her 40's at my
rink who had a total knee reconstruction/ACL and while she was off the ice
for 5 months, she is back better than ever. How you injured your knee
should not influence you. Footwork requires a lot of mechanical torquing
and if you were a little weak to begin with (and hadn't noticed) then it
would take too much to snap the knee all the way.

I, at 57, am just back from a cervical disc and fusion - yes, I do only 1/2
rotation jumps but that is not the point. I also over the past 8 years have
had torn medial meniscus in each knee scoped and trimmed and was back on the
ice on 2 weeks. There are even skaters who have had total joint
replacements! Skating is great fun, great exercise, mentally challenging,
takes you away from everyday worries, and gives you a sense of
accomplishment.

Many skaters on this list and another I know of, have sustained all sorts of
injuries and at all different ages and still returned to skating. Some can
get back up to speed, some do have to downscale their elements. Aside from
the physical, returning to skating is about attitude!

Think positive, and even if you have to have an ACL reconstruction, focus on
your post-op PT with the goal of getting back on the ice. Don't dwell on
the "what if I can't do like I used to....." Think of the many aspects of
skating that in the beginning months you can polish to a gleam. Surely
there are other things besides jumps that you can work on until the time is
right to start jumping - and then go back to single rotation, perfect your
technique, then onward from there.

You CAN do it - you are not alone and we all will encourage you. Keep us
posted! We all wish you the best of luck with your surgery. Skating is for
all ages - two until you die.


"Jen" <jmld9801@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:2c4626ae.0402131244.796b6b9f@posting.google.com...
> Hi everybody,
>
> I just have a general question about returning to skating after an
> injury...I am going to have my knee scoped soon to remove torn
> cartilage and during the scope the surgeon may also need to repair my
> ACL depending on how torn it is. (He thinks it has a bad tear but has
> to scope it to see how much.)
>
> Does anyone know if you can skate again after an ACL reconstruction?
> What about single revolution jumps?
>
> Even if my doc says I can skate again, I'm worried because I injured
> my knee just doing footwork...it's not like I slammed into the boards
> or anything.
>
> I want to skate again, but I think I might feel guilty doing so, like
> it's really something for the younger folks and I have no business
> being out there, given the degree of injury I sustained from what I
> thought at the time was a minor fall.
>
> On the other hand, I feel like it's too soon to give up on the only
> "fun" form of exercise I have found so far.
>
> Any opinions or words of advice?
>
> Thanks much in advance.




13 Feb 2004 23:22:36
Isiafs5
Re: skating after injury

>
>Does anyone know if you can skate again after an ACL reconstruction?
>What about single revolution jumps?

I can think of at least two co-workers that have had ACL surgery and then
returned to playing rather intense basketball. From my experience, the
basketball games are much harder on the knees than ice skating.

>Any opinions or words of advice?

While you are waiting to skate, you can prepare your body for skating skills
such as balancing on your good leg, spiral extension, etc.

For expanding your backyard look into your local international folk dance
group.

I found skating by experimenting with many different activities. Years ago if
anyone suggested that I would ever ice skate regularly I would have thought is
was nonsense. My point is that you may find other fun things if you keep
looking.

Finally, to prevent further injury, I hope you are taking lessons and not
teaching yourself.


Sling Skate

My recommended reading for body fat control:
http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm












13 Feb 2004 23:20:45
skaternum
Re: skating after injury

See below ...

> Does anyone know if you can skate again after an ACL reconstruction?
> What about single revolution jumps?

Yes, yes, yes. If your surgery is successful and you strictly adhere to a
good physical therapy regimen, you can be back better than ever. I had my
knee scoped in 99, and it was the best thing I ever did. Once I got over
being a little timid when I first returned to skating, I soon found that I
had more attack and confidence than ever, simply because I wasn't in pain
anymore. My legs were stronger *after* the surgery than before, because of
the repair and proper strengthening I got from PT.

> Even if my doc says I can skate again, I'm worried because I injured
> my knee just doing footwork...it's not like I slammed into the boards
> or anything.

You can injure your knee doing anything. Heck, you could tear the ACL
tripping over a carpet tack! Don't let the source of the injury bother you.
And if your doctor tells you not to skate again, find another doctor who
isn't prejudiced against "older" athletes.

> I want to skate again, but I think I might feel guilty doing so, like
> it's really something for the younger folks and I have no business
> being out there, given the degree of injury I sustained from what I
> thought at the time was a minor fall.

Um, pardon me, but what the H*** is this nonsense? If you're going to buy
into that crap, why don't you just sell your skates and take up knitting?
No, wait. You might injure yourself on the needles. Best to just sit
quietly and watch everyone else enjoy their lives. ;-)

>
> On the other hand, I feel like it's too soon to give up on the only
> "fun" form of exercise I have found so far.
>
> Any opinions or words of advice?

Yeah. Snap out of it and GET!! GET the surgery, GET over the self-pity,
and GET back on the ice. You'll be fine.

skaternum





13 Feb 2004 19:02:51
jsline@nospam.useless.net
Re: skating after injury

Been there, done that, got that t-shirt.

In Jan 1999, I tore left ACL/MCL skiing. In June 1999 had ACL recon.
Started skating again in April 2000 (I hadn't been skating at the time I
tore the ACL...). The hardest part was trusting the knee to work...i.e. the
mind games. At the time I started skating again, my quad strength was still
deficient because I had been lazy with my rehab...

"Jen" <jmld9801@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:2c4626ae.0402131244.796b6b9f@posting.google.com...
> Hi everybody,
>
> I just have a general question about returning to skating after an
> injury...I am going to have my knee scoped soon to remove torn
> cartilage and during the scope the surgeon may also need to repair my
> ACL depending on how torn it is. (He thinks it has a bad tear but has
> to scope it to see how much.)
>
> Does anyone know if you can skate again after an ACL reconstruction?
> What about single revolution jumps?
>
> Even if my doc says I can skate again, I'm worried because I injured
> my knee just doing footwork...it's not like I slammed into the boards
> or anything.
>
> I want to skate again, but I think I might feel guilty doing so, like
> it's really something for the younger folks and I have no business
> being out there, given the degree of injury I sustained from what I
> thought at the time was a minor fall.
>
> On the other hand, I feel like it's too soon to give up on the only
> "fun" form of exercise I have found so far.
>
> Any opinions or words of advice?
>
> Thanks much in advance.




13 Feb 2004 19:27:20
mary ann sidner
Re: skating after injury

This was an interesting discussion. I am afraid I cower at the thought
of a knee injury from skating (being in my early 50's). Then I look at
the alternatives: not doing anything, or not doing enough exercise.
Sometimes I think the strength of our legs (from skating) protects us
from a lot of injuries most people have.

I have experienced knee problems in the last few years, but they seem
to com and go and doing quadricep exercises and following a healthy
low-calorie diet
seem to make the problems occur less frequently - sometimes, my knee
(it is always the left) feels great.

Thanks for sharing your "older skater" story and hoping you will be
bacdk on the ice soon. Would be interested in knowing how the doctor
determines that surgery is needed.

Lisa


14 Feb 2004 16:26:50
Laura Wood
Re: skating after injury

skaternum wrote:
> Yes, yes, yes. If your surgery is successful and you strictly adhere to a
> good physical therapy regimen, you can be back better than ever. I had my
> knee scoped in 99, and it was the best thing I ever did. Once I got over
> being a little timid when I first returned to skating, I soon found that I
> had more attack and confidence than ever, simply because I wasn't in pain
> anymore. My legs were stronger *after* the surgery than before, because of
> the repair and proper strengthening I got from PT.
(snip)


I just wanted to second this based on the experience of a close friend
of mine. He took up judo roughly 2 years ago and loves it at least as
much as we love skating. He has had ROTTEN LUCK with his knees--just had
surgery on R knee (torn ACL) after tearing ACL, MCL, and meniscus in L
knee and going thru surgery and rehab for that (both injuries happened
in judo classes). I mention this horror story because his doctor was
and is extremely confident about his ability to go back to judo after
PT. As skaternum suggested, you can end up stronger and more stable
than before if you're meticulous about PT.

I think someone on this group once said, semi-jokingly, that doctors
don't want us to do ANYTHING. My friend's Dr. is very encouraging about
him continuing judo; I can't help wondering if the doctors that try to
dissuade us from skating are somewhat "projecting" their own fear. (not
trying to impugn anyone's doctor, just thinking aloud)

--Laura, knee surgery free...so far



14 Feb 2004 16:51:16
Annabel Smyth
Re: skating after injury

On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 at 12:44:23, Jen <jmld9801@yahoo.com > wrote:

>Does anyone know if you can skate again after an ACL reconstruction?
>What about single revolution jumps?
>
Yes, you can. Friend of mine - Adult Silver skater - did hers in
totally skiing one year. She was off the ice for a year, about 4 years
ago, and when she came back she did ice dancing for the first season
(she lives in a country where skating only happens in the winter
months), but she is now back where she belongs, and, I believe, doing
axels.
--
Annabel Smyth mailto:annabel@amsmyth.demon.co.uk
http://www.amsmyth.demon.co.uk/index.html
Website updated 1 February 2004


14 Feb 2004 17:57:26
Catherine Rees Lay
Re: skating after injury

In article <2c4626ae.0402131244.796b6b9f@posting.google.com >, Jen
<jmld9801@yahoo.com > writes
>Hi everybody,
>
>I just have a general question about returning to skating after an
>injury...I am going to have my knee scoped soon to remove torn
>cartilage and during the scope the surgeon may also need to repair my
>ACL depending on how torn it is. (He thinks it has a bad tear but has
>to scope it to see how much.)
>
>Does anyone know if you can skate again after an ACL reconstruction?
>What about single revolution jumps?
>
>Even if my doc says I can skate again, I'm worried because I injured
>my knee just doing footwork...it's not like I slammed into the boards
>or anything.
>
>I want to skate again, but I think I might feel guilty doing so, like
>it's really something for the younger folks and I have no business
>being out there, given the degree of injury I sustained from what I
>thought at the time was a minor fall.
>
My father-in-law (age 70+) went skating as usual one Tuesday morning
about 5 years ago. Spent a couple of hours doing edges, dances, all the
usual things for him. Walked out of the ice rink the 800 yards to the
bus stop, stepped off the kerb quickly to cross the road to catch the
bus and tore his Achilles tendon.

Oh, he's back skating now.

>On the other hand, I feel like it's too soon to give up on the only
>"fun" form of exercise I have found so far.
>
>Any opinions or words of advice?
>
Don't give up! Exercise is particularly good for you as you get older,
so is concentrating on things and learning new skills. Skating provides
all three.

Catherine.
--
Catherine Rees Lay
To email me, use my first name in front of the "at".


17 Feb 2004 09:04:16
Jen
Re: skating after injury

Thank you everyone...I feel better after reading your messages. Your
words about returning to skating are so encouraging. Thanks for
reminding me that you can hurt yourself even tripping over carpet or a
curb (yes, I've done that too). Makes me feel less guilty for the
inconvenience I have caused my friends and family members from this
injury.

I hope no one is worried after reading my posts. It is true that my
injury was from something minor, but when I think back, I can recall
some prior weakness in my knee during recreational gymnastics as a
kid. So, it is possible my knee was weak to begin with or maybe had a
prior injury that never fully healed.

To answer the question about the decision to have surgery---from what
I've heard, some folks with ACL tears (maybe partial tears?) do not
have much difficulty with their normal activities. In my case, I can't
walk anymore so I definitely need the surgery to see if it can help. I
also may have loose cartilage or bone floating around in my knee and
if so, that will need to be removed. But a lot of folks with ACL or
meniscus injuries do not have as much trouble as I've had. Look at
Plushenko!! Quad jumps on a torn meniscus. Although I worry about his
knee in the long run, that he may be causing more damage. However, he
is well trained, so I'm sure he knows the best ways to land to reduce
impact and strain. Anyway, I digress...

Thank you again for all your support--and your reminders that life is
short, we have to live while we can.

Jen


17 Feb 2004 21:25:01
Doris Penndorf
Re: skating after injury


"Jen" <jmld9801@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:2c4626ae.0402170904.2d1eb35c@posting.google.com...
> Thank you everyone...I feel better after reading your messages. Your
> words about returning to skating are so encouraging.

> To answer the question about the decision to have surgery---from what
> I've heard, some folks with ACL tears (maybe partial tears?) do not
> have much difficulty with their normal activities.

It is more like whether the injury was an acute trama or a chronic slow
process. Where the tear actually happens along the length of the ligament
may determine the extent of pain/limitation of motion as well as if it is a
partial tear versus a complete tear.

> also may have loose cartilage or bone floating around in my knee and
> if so, that will need to be removed.

That is the easy part - all it entails is flooding the joint with fluid and
rinsing it out - The arthroscopic instruments easily remove loose particles,
etc., and smooth the remaining surfaces.

But a lot of folks with ACL or
> meniscus injuries do not have as much trouble as I've had. Look at
> Plushenko!! Quad jumps on a torn meniscus.

Again that depends on where the tear occurs - remember I had one chronically
torn meniscus (the original tear did not give me any problem until several
years later when the torn edge would catch between the femur and the tibia;
the other was an acute tear where the meniscus tore where it attaches to the
bone - much more painful.) The same holds true for an ACL but it is a
ligament, not a cartilage, surgery is more involved and recovery is longer
if there is a complete tear versus a partial.

> Thank you again for all your support--and your reminders that life is
> short, we have to live while we can.

Absolutely! Did your MD give you any brochure that explains the anatomy of
the knee joint? If not, please have someone get you a simple anatomy/sports
medicine book from the store or your library. Until he actually gets into
the knee, he really can't 100% say what is all going on - many a time they
are surprised at the actual anatomy; sometimes good, sometimes more serious.
I think you are making the right decision to go forward with surgery and
wish you the very best!! In the scheme of things, a lifetime, a number of
months is a small percentage-----

Have you set a date for your surgery? We all will be sending you our Get
Well Wishes!

Doris