13 Nov 2004 13:58:57
Samotnik
How to use bow thruster?

Hello,

I have skippered boats up to 45', but I have never used the bow
thruster, simply because those boats were not equipped with it.

Now I'm going to charter a Gib Sea 51 in Greece. It's quite a big boat,
in my opinion, for the tight Mediterranean marinas, so I think that
sometimes I will be forced to use the bow thruster. But how to use it
while approaching astern to the pier?

I've read that bow thruster works in a most effective way when the speed
is low. But imagine this situation - the boat is moving backwards,
towards the wind and I have to turn 90 deg to starboard to fit in a
'hole' in a marina. How to do it with the help of a bowthruster? I cam
imagine two scenarios:

* similar as without the bow thruster - to give a quite fair speed backwards
and turn the rudder. If the boats will be responding poorly, then I use
the bow thruster to 'kick' the bow. This scenario is the one I've
always used, but on 42-45 ft boats whithout bow thruster it was sometimes
hard to get in the Med marinas easily, and I have to be very careful,
because I was moving quite fast backwards, the rudder was very hard to
control and it was easy to hit another boat. On the other side, if you're
doing it slowly and there's any wind, you're drifting much more than moving
in the right direction.

* or a way called "i'm sure this bow thruster works!' ;) - give a low
speed with the engine, go a little up wind and then start the
bowthruster with the rudder set to '0' until it gets the bow in the
right point, and then give a larger throttle backwards to move in the
'gap'.

Which way is better? I've seen people doing it either way, but most of
those holiday-sailors have screwed it up, completely, with no matter
to their intentions. :) Most of them have made use of the bowthruster in
a moments which certainly did not require it, so I believe their problems
were a product of thinking "I have a bowthruster, so I can forget about
any seaman skills'.

But I really would like to know how the bowthruster can help me on a boat
this size.

Regards,
--
Samotnik



13 Nov 2004 15:16:55
James
Re: How to use bow thruster?

The first opportunity you get... you find some open but calmish water and
chuck out a fender with abour 2 meters of chain attached.

Now you can "play" with the boat and find out what it will and wont
do..relative to a fixed point in the water....... without damage resulting
from the "error" side of "trial and error"
I *always* do this when using a boat with which i am not familiar... And it
is always a useful exercise.


"Samotnik" <samotnik@samotnia.eu.org > wrote in message
news:cn53v0$4r2$1@atlantis.news.tpi.pl...
> Hello,
>
> I have skippered boats up to 45', but I have never used the bow
> thruster, simply because those boats were not equipped with it.
>
> Now I'm going to charter a Gib Sea 51 in Greece. It's quite a big boat,
> in my opinion, for the tight Mediterranean marinas, so I think that
> sometimes I will be forced to use the bow thruster. But how to use it
> while approaching astern to the pier?
>
> I've read that bow thruster works in a most effective way when the speed
> is low. But imagine this situation - the boat is moving backwards,
> towards the wind and I have to turn 90 deg to starboard to fit in a
> 'hole' in a marina. How to do it with the help of a bowthruster? I cam
> imagine two scenarios:
>
> * similar as without the bow thruster - to give a quite fair speed
> backwards
> and turn the rudder. If the boats will be responding poorly, then I use
> the bow thruster to 'kick' the bow. This scenario is the one I've
> always used, but on 42-45 ft boats whithout bow thruster it was sometimes
> hard to get in the Med marinas easily, and I have to be very careful,
> because I was moving quite fast backwards, the rudder was very hard to
> control and it was easy to hit another boat. On the other side, if you're
> doing it slowly and there's any wind, you're drifting much more than
> moving
> in the right direction.
>
> * or a way called "i'm sure this bow thruster works!' ;) - give a low
> speed with the engine, go a little up wind and then start the
> bowthruster with the rudder set to '0' until it gets the bow in the
> right point, and then give a larger throttle backwards to move in the
> 'gap'.
>
> Which way is better? I've seen people doing it either way, but most of
> those holiday-sailors have screwed it up, completely, with no matter
> to their intentions. :) Most of them have made use of the bowthruster in
> a moments which certainly did not require it, so I believe their problems
> were a product of thinking "I have a bowthruster, so I can forget about
> any seaman skills'.
>
> But I really would like to know how the bowthruster can help me on a boat
> this size.
>
> Regards,
> --
> Samotnik
>




28 Nov 2004 00:53:12
Richard Faulkner
Re: How to use bow thruster?

In message <cn53v0$4r2$1@atlantis.news.tpi.pl >, Samotnik
<samotnik@samotnia.eu.org > writes
>* or a way called "i'm sure this bow thruster works!' ;) - give a low
> speed with the engine, go a little up wind and then start the
> bowthruster with the rudder set to '0' until it gets the bow in the
> right point, and then give a larger throttle backwards to move in the
> 'gap'.

This seems to be the way that the excursion boats in Madeira do it when
mooring stern to. It worked for me in Bayona with a strong side wind -
not easy. I also saw several yachts miss the gap and end up side on to
the bows of the neighbouring yachts.

--
Richard Faulkner


28 Nov 2004 17:35:40
Mike James
Re: How to use bow thruster?

Richard Faulkner wrote:

> In message <cn53v0$4r2$1@atlantis.news.tpi.pl>, Samotnik
> <samotnik@samotnia.eu.org> writes
>
>> * or a way called "i'm sure this bow thruster works!' ;) - give a low
>> speed with the engine, go a little up wind and then start the
>> bowthruster with the rudder set to '0' until it gets the bow in the
>> right point, and then give a larger throttle backwards to move in the
>> 'gap'.
>
>
> This seems to be the way that the excursion boats in Madeira do it when
> mooring stern to. It worked for me in Bayona with a strong side wind -
> not easy. I also saw several yachts miss the gap and end up side on to
> the bows of the neighbouring yachts.
>
And for a reminder read the Vetus specifications on some of their units
: maximum use is 2 minutes in 24 hour period. Big motors with minimal
cooling, just mass to store heat.