19 Jul 2004 01:20:30
Cybershark
ColdHeat soldering tool

first, before you go tell me I'm off topic...I'm considering this primarily
for workin' on gun boards...

if you haven't seen this thing go to www.coldheat.com and check out the
propaganda...basically it's a very quick heating portable soldering
iron...here's what I don't get though...it has a split tip by default...this
tip is live on one 1/2 and then it grounds back through the other half to
create the circuit and generate the heat...that part's all cool...and they
suggest not using it on sensitive electronics in part because of the chance
of discharging that current into your device...they also make a fine point
tip...for finer soldering...which would be perfect for doing PB
boards...does this fine point tip use a similar activation method? it
doesn't look split to me, so I can't find how it turns on...if it doesn't
use the same current dump through the part then it should be much safer for
component work...

anyone used one of these on small circuit systems like PB gear or used the
fine point tip in one for anything? how's it work? it sounds like a good
idea to me...can't think of how often I'm away from the house and wanna
solder stuff...but maybe that's just me
Ken




19 Jul 2004 06:28:51
derrick
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

i've used the fine point for soldering on mouse boards. i have no
idea how it works, but i've had no problems with it frying the boards
on mice or keyboards. and the actual tool is incredible. i recommend
it to any modder.

"Cybershark" <[email protected] > wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> first, before you go tell me I'm off topic...I'm considering this primarily
> for workin' on gun boards...
>
> if you haven't seen this thing go to www.coldheat.com and check out the
> propaganda...basically it's a very quick heating portable soldering
> iron...here's what I don't get though...it has a split tip by default...this
> tip is live on one 1/2 and then it grounds back through the other half to
> create the circuit and generate the heat...that part's all cool...and they
> suggest not using it on sensitive electronics in part because of the chance
> of discharging that current into your device...they also make a fine point
> tip...for finer soldering...which would be perfect for doing PB
> boards...does this fine point tip use a similar activation method? it
> doesn't look split to me, so I can't find how it turns on...if it doesn't
> use the same current dump through the part then it should be much safer for
> component work...
>
> anyone used one of these on small circuit systems like PB gear or used the
> fine point tip in one for anything? how's it work? it sounds like a good
> idea to me...can't think of how often I'm away from the house and wanna
> solder stuff...but maybe that's just me
> Ken


19 Jul 2004 13:39:14
bolt
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 01:20:30 -0500, "Cybershark"
<[email protected] > wrote:

>first, before you go tell me I'm off topic...I'm considering this primarily
>for workin' on gun boards...
>
>if you haven't seen this thing go to www.coldheat.com and check out the
>propaganda...basically it's a very quick heating portable soldering
>iron...here's what I don't get though...it has a split tip by default...this
>tip is live on one 1/2 and then it grounds back through the other half to
>create the circuit and generate the heat...that part's all cool...and they
>suggest not using it on sensitive electronics in part because of the chance
>of discharging that current into your device...they also make a fine point
>tip...for finer soldering...which would be perfect for doing PB
>boards...does this fine point tip use a similar activation method? it
>doesn't look split to me, so I can't find how it turns on...if it doesn't
>use the same current dump through the part then it should be much safer for
>component work...
>
>anyone used one of these on small circuit systems like PB gear or used the
>fine point tip in one for anything? how's it work? it sounds like a good
>idea to me...can't think of how often I'm away from the house and wanna
>solder stuff...but maybe that's just me
>Ken
>

I have one and it works great. The instructions say that you want to
keep it away from any circuits that are especially suseptable to power
surges. Essentially, there are two electrodes on it. When you solder
with it,you are shorting the piece you are working with between the 2
electrodes. Because of this, the piece heats up pretty quick. You
also are inducing an electical surge when you solder.

bolt


19 Jul 2004 15:52:36
Jeff Goslin
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

"bolt" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I have one and it works great. The instructions say that you want to
> keep it away from any circuits that are especially suseptable to power
> surges. Essentially, there are two electrodes on it. When you solder
> with it,you are shorting the piece you are working with between the 2
> electrodes. Because of this, the piece heats up pretty quick. You
> also are inducing an electical surge when you solder.

Now, maybe it's just me, but I wouldn't imagine that people would often use
solder to attach two things that were NOT having electricity passed through
them, and hence, were subject to the problems associated with electrical
surges. Basically, if surges are a problem this thing brings on, surely it
becomes outright useless for it's intended purpose...???

--
Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
It's not a god complex when you're always right





19 Jul 2004 15:01:05
Cybershark
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

what parts of a mouse board? basically I'm wondering if you've soldered IC
pins with it...if it's just resistors and caps and such then they're much
more resistant to damage...as bolt says in the other reply...
"you want to keep it away from any circuits that are especially suseptable
to power surges. Essentially, there are two electrodes on it. When you
solder
with it,you are shorting the piece you are working with between the 2
electrodes"

So I guess what I'm REALLY asking is this...what's the definition of
"sensitive components" in this case...I would guess most pic based chips
would be ok since they're usually pretty overbuilt...I would also assume
that things like the little capacitance based touch switch circuits I have
would probably be too sensitive since they have less protection on them for
more accurate measurements...am I wrong? if I get one and use it to repair
a cut trace on my rainmaker's board or my buddy's BKO, am I gonna cook
anything? I know the real answer is always gonna be "possibly," but I'm
wondering if any of you have done similar jobs and had success...

Ken

"derrick" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> i've used the fine point for soldering on mouse boards. i have no
> idea how it works, but i've had no problems with it frying the boards
> on mice or keyboards. and the actual tool is incredible. i recommend
> it to any modder.
>
> "Cybershark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected] >...
> > first, before you go tell me I'm off topic...I'm considering this
primarily
> > for workin' on gun boards...
> >
> > if you haven't seen this thing go to www.coldheat.com and check out the
> > propaganda...basically it's a very quick heating portable soldering
> > iron...here's what I don't get though...it has a split tip by
default...this
> > tip is live on one 1/2 and then it grounds back through the other half
to
> > create the circuit and generate the heat...that part's all cool...and
they
> > suggest not using it on sensitive electronics in part because of the
chance
> > of discharging that current into your device...they also make a fine
point
> > tip...for finer soldering...which would be perfect for doing PB
> > boards...does this fine point tip use a similar activation method? it
> > doesn't look split to me, so I can't find how it turns on...if it
doesn't
> > use the same current dump through the part then it should be much safer
for
> > component work...
> >
> > anyone used one of these on small circuit systems like PB gear or used
the
> > fine point tip in one for anything? how's it work? it sounds like a
good
> > idea to me...can't think of how often I'm away from the house and wanna
> > solder stuff...but maybe that's just me
> > Ken




19 Jul 2004 20:06:46
Jon C
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

Cybershark wrote:

> first, before you go tell me I'm off topic...I'm considering this primarily
> for workin' on gun boards...
>
> if you haven't seen this thing go to www.coldheat.com and check out the
> propaganda...basically it's a very quick heating portable soldering
> iron...here's what I don't get though...it has a split tip by default...this
> tip is live on one 1/2 and then it grounds back through the other half to
> create the circuit and generate the heat...that part's all cool...and they
> suggest not using it on sensitive electronics in part because of the chance
> of discharging that current into your device...they also make a fine point
> tip...for finer soldering...which would be perfect for doing PB
> boards...does this fine point tip use a similar activation method? it
> doesn't look split to me, so I can't find how it turns on...if it doesn't
> use the same current dump through the part then it should be much safer for
> component work...
>
> anyone used one of these on small circuit systems like PB gear or used the
> fine point tip in one for anything? how's it work? it sounds like a good
> idea to me...can't think of how often I'm away from the house and wanna
> solder stuff...but maybe that's just me
> Ken
>
>

Just by looking at it, I'd guess that the point tip (since you can't exactly
create a circuit with just a point) is simply a resistor itself, with
current flowing through it. Ceramic, something like that. Since it's not a
conductor and you're only touching at one point you can't send electricity
through your stuff.

That's my guess. Call and ask them.
Jon


19 Jul 2004 13:10:57
Jose
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

Not necessarily. Many of the things you would use a soldering iron for are
not going to be affected by a capacitance type discharge when you first
connect the soldering iron. Things like window leading and tinning leads is
no big deal, but IC's can be very sensitive to discharges that a soldering
iron like that is likely to create. That is why when you work on any kind
of sophisticated electronics, you will use a properly grounded soldering
iron. Personally, I wouldn't risk using that thing on a computer. Matter
of fact, I would not use it on anything that has IC's on the board at all.
Better to play it safe than have to replace a board.

Jose


"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "bolt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > I have one and it works great. The instructions say that you want to
> > keep it away from any circuits that are especially suseptable to power
> > surges. Essentially, there are two electrodes on it. When you solder
> > with it,you are shorting the piece you are working with between the 2
> > electrodes. Because of this, the piece heats up pretty quick. You
> > also are inducing an electical surge when you solder.
>
> Now, maybe it's just me, but I wouldn't imagine that people would often
use
> solder to attach two things that were NOT having electricity passed
through
> them, and hence, were subject to the problems associated with electrical
> surges. Basically, if surges are a problem this thing brings on, surely
it
> becomes outright useless for it's intended purpose...???
>
> --
> Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
> It's not a god complex when you're always right
>
>
>




19 Jul 2004 20:13:24
Jon C
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

Jon C wrote:

> Cybershark wrote:
>
>> first, before you go tell me I'm off topic...I'm considering this
>> primarily
>> for workin' on gun boards...
>>
>> if you haven't seen this thing go to www.coldheat.com and check out the
>> propaganda...basically it's a very quick heating portable soldering
>> iron...here's what I don't get though...it has a split tip by
>> default...this
>> tip is live on one 1/2 and then it grounds back through the other half to
>> create the circuit and generate the heat...that part's all cool...and
>> they
>> suggest not using it on sensitive electronics in part because of the
>> chance
>> of discharging that current into your device...they also make a fine
>> point
>> tip...for finer soldering...which would be perfect for doing PB
>> boards...does this fine point tip use a similar activation method? it
>> doesn't look split to me, so I can't find how it turns on...if it doesn't
>> use the same current dump through the part then it should be much
>> safer for
>> component work...
>>
>> anyone used one of these on small circuit systems like PB gear or used
>> the
>> fine point tip in one for anything? how's it work? it sounds like a
>> good
>> idea to me...can't think of how often I'm away from the house and wanna
>> solder stuff...but maybe that's just me
>> Ken
>>
>>
>
> Just by looking at it, I'd guess that the point tip (since you can't
> exactly create a circuit with just a point) is simply a resistor itself,
> with current flowing through it. Ceramic, something like that. Since
> it's not a conductor and you're only touching at one point you can't
> send electricity through your stuff.
>
> That's my guess. Call and ask them.
> Jon

Actually, no, looks like I'm wrong. The closer I look the more it looks
like the point tip is simply split down the middle. Still, I don't think
there would be too much problem using it with electronics or IC's since the
electrical path will be one way and so short.


19 Jul 2004 15:23:38
Cybershark
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

unless you touch the + end to the part first...it could discharge the full
force through the IC from my understanding...if it's in any way a grounded
circuit...this is the part that bugs me...and yeah, I can't tell from the
pic or not whether that's a split or not running down the center of the
point...also it can't be a simple resistor...they claim it'll achieve
upwards of 1000 degrees in a couple seconds and it'll continue to rise..if
it was constantly on whenever the fine point was engaged it'll tear it's
batteries apart pretty quick...
Ken
"Jon C" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Jon C wrote:
>
> > Cybershark wrote:
> >
> >> first, before you go tell me I'm off topic...I'm considering this
> >> primarily
> >> for workin' on gun boards...
> >>
> >> if you haven't seen this thing go to www.coldheat.com and check out the
> >> propaganda...basically it's a very quick heating portable soldering
> >> iron...here's what I don't get though...it has a split tip by
> >> default...this
> >> tip is live on one 1/2 and then it grounds back through the other half
to
> >> create the circuit and generate the heat...that part's all cool...and
> >> they
> >> suggest not using it on sensitive electronics in part because of the
> >> chance
> >> of discharging that current into your device...they also make a fine
> >> point
> >> tip...for finer soldering...which would be perfect for doing PB
> >> boards...does this fine point tip use a similar activation method? it
> >> doesn't look split to me, so I can't find how it turns on...if it
doesn't
> >> use the same current dump through the part then it should be much
> >> safer for
> >> component work...
> >>
> >> anyone used one of these on small circuit systems like PB gear or used
> >> the
> >> fine point tip in one for anything? how's it work? it sounds like a
> >> good
> >> idea to me...can't think of how often I'm away from the house and wanna
> >> solder stuff...but maybe that's just me
> >> Ken
> >>
> >>
> >
> > Just by looking at it, I'd guess that the point tip (since you can't
> > exactly create a circuit with just a point) is simply a resistor itself,
> > with current flowing through it. Ceramic, something like that. Since
> > it's not a conductor and you're only touching at one point you can't
> > send electricity through your stuff.
> >
> > That's my guess. Call and ask them.
> > Jon
>
> Actually, no, looks like I'm wrong. The closer I look the more it looks
> like the point tip is simply split down the middle. Still, I don't think
> there would be too much problem using it with electronics or IC's since
the
> electrical path will be one way and so short.




20 Jul 2004 09:58:29
bolt
Re: ColdHeat soldering tool

On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 15:23:38 -0500, "Cybershark"
<[email protected] > wrote:

>unless you touch the + end to the part first...it could discharge the full
>force through the IC from my understanding...if it's in any way a grounded
>circuit...this is the part that bugs me...and yeah, I can't tell from the
>pic or not whether that's a split or not running down the center of the
>point...also it can't be a simple resistor...they claim it'll achieve
>upwards of 1000 degrees in a couple seconds and it'll continue to rise..if
>it was constantly on whenever the fine point was engaged it'll tear it's
>batteries apart pretty quick...
>Ken

The tips are split. Nothing happens until both sides of the tips make
contact with what you are soldering. It heats up super fast and cools
down to the touch in seconds. The instructions claim that the
batteries will last for 450 solder joints. Also, there is a small
white LED near the tip that illuminates the work area.

>>
>> Actually, no, looks like I'm wrong. The closer I look the more it looks
>> like the point tip is simply split down the middle. Still, I don't think
>> there would be too much problem using it with electronics or IC's since
>the
>> electrical path will be one way and so short.
>
You are right, the path is very short. I'm not electrical engineer,
but I think the only time you'd really have to worry is if you had a
part/circuit that is particularly sensitive to electrical discharges,
much like static sensitive components. It takes a little getting used
to, but when you get the hang of it, it's great. So far I've only
used mine to solder some wires and LED's, but I's think that you would
be ok with most IC's as long as you watch your temperature. If people
want, I can take some close up pics and post the URL's.

bolt