31 May 2004 04:09:21
Jeff Goslin
OT: mechanics are good to have as friends

One of my best friends just recently arrived home from his 8 year stint in
the army, where he served as a heavy vehicle mechanic. So he knows about
like engines n brakes n shocks n lotsa other car-type stuff.

I really didn't think about it too much until my brakes started to go just
recently. I remember the last time they were done, it was OODLES of cash to
get it done. So... how to save money? My buddy said he'd fix my car for
parts plus beer. A case of beer, and the cost of parts, and my car is
fixed... right... ok then, DONE!

When I tell you this, I want you to remember that I am an admitted car
retard. So, with that: the rotors, pads and shoes in my brakes needed
replacing. At the same time, he said "this is running rough, let's do some
other shit to it!" Alrighty then! He changes the spark plugs, the wires,
retimes the engine, refills the A/C and does a whole bunch of other stuff to
it.

Total cost: $130 in parts, $20 in beer, and my '91 (ex)shitmobile is now
purring like a kitten. To get all that stuff done at a garage would
probably have run me upwards of $600 or more(don't even want to GUESS how
much it would be). Suffice it to say, if you have a friend who is a
mechanic, make use of his services!

--
Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
It's not a god complex when you're always right





31 May 2004 12:36:38
EdTheWard
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends


"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> When I tell you this, I want you to remember that I am an admitted car
> retard. > --
> Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
> It's not a god complex when you're always right
>
>
>

OOOOhhhhhhhh! I thought you mentiond you ARE a retard, not a CAR retard.

my bad.


:-)




31 May 2004 14:43:11
Volt
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

It's even cooler when you know how to do that stuff yourself, Car-tard. ;-)

--

Volt
www.liquimetal.com

"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> One of my best friends just recently arrived home from his 8 year stint in
> the army, where he served as a heavy vehicle mechanic. So he knows about
> like engines n brakes n shocks n lotsa other car-type stuff.
>
> I really didn't think about it too much until my brakes started to go just
> recently. I remember the last time they were done, it was OODLES of cash
to
> get it done. So... how to save money? My buddy said he'd fix my car for
> parts plus beer. A case of beer, and the cost of parts, and my car is
> fixed... right... ok then, DONE!
>
> When I tell you this, I want you to remember that I am an admitted car
> retard. So, with that: the rotors, pads and shoes in my brakes needed
> replacing. At the same time, he said "this is running rough, let's do
some
> other shit to it!" Alrighty then! He changes the spark plugs, the wires,
> retimes the engine, refills the A/C and does a whole bunch of other stuff
to
> it.
>
> Total cost: $130 in parts, $20 in beer, and my '91 (ex)shitmobile is now
> purring like a kitten. To get all that stuff done at a garage would
> probably have run me upwards of $600 or more(don't even want to GUESS how
> much it would be). Suffice it to say, if you have a friend who is a
> mechanic, make use of his services!
>
> --
> Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
> It's not a god complex when you're always right
>
>
>




31 May 2004 15:16:22
LCT Paintball
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends



--
"Don't be misled, bad company corrupts good character."
www.LCTPaintball.com
www.LCTProducts.com


"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> One of my best friends just recently arrived home from his 8 year stint in
> the army, where he served as a heavy vehicle mechanic. So he knows about
> like engines n brakes n shocks n lotsa other car-type stuff.
>

That's interesting. It seems your best friend is, according to your views,
probably one of the dumbest people on earth. You know, in the military, AND
a mechanic. You must have a lot of respect for him! ;)




31 May 2004 15:35:07
Jeff Goslin
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

But... if I don't know how to do it myself, I don't have to do it myself. I
just have to stand there, drink beer and hand tools to someone who does. ;)

--
Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
It's not a god complex when you're always right


"Volt" <[email protected]***spamblock***maxvpaintball.com > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> It's even cooler when you know how to do that stuff yourself, Car-tard.
;-)
>
> --
>
> Volt
> www.liquimetal.com
>
> "Jeff Goslin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > One of my best friends just recently arrived home from his 8 year stint
in
> > the army, where he served as a heavy vehicle mechanic. So he knows
about
> > like engines n brakes n shocks n lotsa other car-type stuff.
> >
> > I really didn't think about it too much until my brakes started to go
just
> > recently. I remember the last time they were done, it was OODLES of
cash
> to
> > get it done. So... how to save money? My buddy said he'd fix my car
for
> > parts plus beer. A case of beer, and the cost of parts, and my car is
> > fixed... right... ok then, DONE!
> >
> > When I tell you this, I want you to remember that I am an admitted car
> > retard. So, with that: the rotors, pads and shoes in my brakes needed
> > replacing. At the same time, he said "this is running rough, let's do
> some
> > other shit to it!" Alrighty then! He changes the spark plugs, the
wires,
> > retimes the engine, refills the A/C and does a whole bunch of other
stuff
> to
> > it.
> >
> > Total cost: $130 in parts, $20 in beer, and my '91 (ex)shitmobile is
now
> > purring like a kitten. To get all that stuff done at a garage would
> > probably have run me upwards of $600 or more(don't even want to GUESS
how
> > much it would be). Suffice it to say, if you have a friend who is a
> > mechanic, make use of his services!
> >
> > --
> > Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
> > It's not a god complex when you're always right
> >
> >
> >
>
>




31 May 2004 15:58:40
Jeff Goslin
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

"LCT Paintball" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:a%[email protected]_s51...
> That's interesting. It seems your best friend is, according to your views,
> probably one of the dumbest people on earth. You know, in the military,
AND
> a mechanic. You must have a lot of respect for him! ;)

Worse than that, actually. His life choices essentially put him where he
is, which is what I've been saying all along. His position in life only
serves to reinforce my viewpoint. He's one of the smartest guys I know, yet
he made one incredibly dumb decision. He decided to have sex without
protection with a girl, and now has a daughter because of it.

His biggest problem is "honor without intelligence". He's so worried about
"doing the right thing" that he doesn't do the smart thing, even though he
knows what the smart thing is. He should not have married the girl he did,
simply because she was pregnant, and EVERYONE knew it, even him, despite his
admonishions to the contrary. This decision, to marry for honor rather than
love, was a turning point in his life. He was then almost required to go
into a series of meaningless, menial, low paying jobs to support himself and
his family. When his marraige inevitably imploded, he was left with little
option but to go into the army, which provided him with steady income that
he otherwise would not have been able to count on, given his education
level.

Quite frankly, I've never respected his decision to join the military. It
was done out of necessity rather than desire. He had precious few choices,
and of his available options, he chose military service. It was stupid, if
you ask me. He's simply too smart to have gone into the military. However,
his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by the
military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say "uh, ok".
At this point in his life, it would be stupid to NOT avail himself of the
only really marketable skill he has.

And yes, I have plenty of respect for him, but not because he joined the
army and became a mechanic. Rather, it's DESPITE the fact that he joined
the army and became a mechanic. He knows how I feel on the subjects, and
appreciates my position.

--
Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
It's not a god complex when you're always right





31 May 2004 17:56:09
Daniel Martin
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

HEck Jeff, you just clue in to this now? <G >
Maybe if you had more friends , you would see their talents. <G >

Cheers
BTW, That area of Detroit Mexicantown.. oh, that';s pretty!

Dan


"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> One of my best friends just recently arrived home from his 8 year stint in
> the army, where he served as a heavy vehicle mechanic. So he knows about
> like engines n brakes n shocks n lotsa other car-type stuff.
>
> I really didn't think about it too much until my brakes started to go just
> recently. I remember the last time they were done, it was OODLES of cash
to
> get it done. So... how to save money? My buddy said he'd fix my car for
> parts plus beer. A case of beer, and the cost of parts, and my car is
> fixed... right... ok then, DONE!
>
> When I tell you this, I want you to remember that I am an admitted car
> retard. So, with that: the rotors, pads and shoes in my brakes needed
> replacing. At the same time, he said "this is running rough, let's do
some
> other shit to it!" Alrighty then! He changes the spark plugs, the wires,
> retimes the engine, refills the A/C and does a whole bunch of other stuff
to
> it.
>
> Total cost: $130 in parts, $20 in beer, and my '91 (ex)shitmobile is now
> purring like a kitten. To get all that stuff done at a garage would
> probably have run me upwards of $600 or more(don't even want to GUESS how
> much it would be). Suffice it to say, if you have a friend who is a
> mechanic, make use of his services!
>
> --
> Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
> It's not a god complex when you're always right
>
>
>






01 Jun 2004 15:51:59
-=GriFter=-
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

*snip*
However,
his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by the
military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say "uh, ok".
*snip*

This is complete hogwash. If this guy is as smart as you say he is than he
would have had other options than a mechanic. The military doesn't assign or
force someone into any particular job class. This just shows either you
don't know what you're talking about, or he's feeding you a line of
bullshit. He would of had to of taken the ASVAB and according to what he
would have scored on that test would have shown him what he was eligible
for. Normally the mechanic and truck driver are reserved for the complete
dumbassses who barely pass the test, the ones who don't pass the test are
referred to the Marines. Anywho, he didn't get drafted and if he didn't like
being a mechanic he could of reclassed to another job class. Being a
mechanic was his own choice, and I can guarantee you it wasn't "forced" by
any means.

Just out of curiousity where and what unit was he stationed with?
--


-=GriFter=-


"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
| "LCT Paintball" <[email protected] > wrote in message
| news:a%[email protected]_s51...
| > That's interesting. It seems your best friend is, according to your
views,
| > probably one of the dumbest people on earth. You know, in the military,
| AND
| > a mechanic. You must have a lot of respect for him! ;)
|
| Worse than that, actually. His life choices essentially put him where he
| is, which is what I've been saying all along. His position in life only
| serves to reinforce my viewpoint. He's one of the smartest guys I know,
yet
| he made one incredibly dumb decision. He decided to have sex without
| protection with a girl, and now has a daughter because of it.
|
| His biggest problem is "honor without intelligence". He's so worried
about
| "doing the right thing" that he doesn't do the smart thing, even though he
| knows what the smart thing is. He should not have married the girl he
did,
| simply because she was pregnant, and EVERYONE knew it, even him, despite
his
| admonishions to the contrary. This decision, to marry for honor rather
than
| love, was a turning point in his life. He was then almost required to go
| into a series of meaningless, menial, low paying jobs to support himself
and
| his family. When his marraige inevitably imploded, he was left with
little
| option but to go into the army, which provided him with steady income that
| he otherwise would not have been able to count on, given his education
| level.
|
| Quite frankly, I've never respected his decision to join the military. It
| was done out of necessity rather than desire. He had precious few
choices,
| and of his available options, he chose military service. It was stupid,
if
| you ask me. He's simply too smart to have gone into the military.
However,
| his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by the
| military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say "uh,
ok".
| At this point in his life, it would be stupid to NOT avail himself of the
| only really marketable skill he has.
|
| And yes, I have plenty of respect for him, but not because he joined the
| army and became a mechanic. Rather, it's DESPITE the fact that he joined
| the army and became a mechanic. He knows how I feel on the subjects, and
| appreciates my position.
|
| --
| Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
| It's not a god complex when you're always right
|
|
|




01 Jun 2004 09:27:57
Jose
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

ASVAB score aside, you will be assigned a job depending on the requirements
of the service. If you don't like it, tough. Re-classing is not as easy as
you make it out to be. It requires a whole new run of schooling and the
military is not hip to spend money on people during peace time. Also,
mechanic is not a "dumb ass" job. Truck driver is definitely low level, but
it takes mechanical aptitude and (depending on the level of mechanic you are
at) a fair amount of knowledge and intelligence to understand the
electrical/mechanical assemblies you deal with. Based on what you are
saying, I am assuming you are not a mechanic.

If you were in the service, may I ask which one and what you job class was?


Jose


"-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> *snip*
> However,
> his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by the
> military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say "uh,
ok".
> *snip*
>
> This is complete hogwash. If this guy is as smart as you say he is than he
> would have had other options than a mechanic. The military doesn't assign
or
> force someone into any particular job class. This just shows either you
> don't know what you're talking about, or he's feeding you a line of
> bullshit. He would of had to of taken the ASVAB and according to what he
> would have scored on that test would have shown him what he was eligible
> for. Normally the mechanic and truck driver are reserved for the complete
> dumbassses who barely pass the test, the ones who don't pass the test are
> referred to the Marines. Anywho, he didn't get drafted and if he didn't
like
> being a mechanic he could of reclassed to another job class. Being a
> mechanic was his own choice, and I can guarantee you it wasn't "forced" by
> any means.
>
> Just out of curiousity where and what unit was he stationed with?
> --
>
>
> -=GriFter=-
>
>
> "Jeff Goslin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> | "LCT Paintball" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | news:a%[email protected]_s51...
> | > That's interesting. It seems your best friend is, according to your
> views,
> | > probably one of the dumbest people on earth. You know, in the
military,
> | AND
> | > a mechanic. You must have a lot of respect for him! ;)
> |
> | Worse than that, actually. His life choices essentially put him where
he
> | is, which is what I've been saying all along. His position in life only
> | serves to reinforce my viewpoint. He's one of the smartest guys I know,
> yet
> | he made one incredibly dumb decision. He decided to have sex without
> | protection with a girl, and now has a daughter because of it.
> |
> | His biggest problem is "honor without intelligence". He's so worried
> about
> | "doing the right thing" that he doesn't do the smart thing, even though
he
> | knows what the smart thing is. He should not have married the girl he
> did,
> | simply because she was pregnant, and EVERYONE knew it, even him, despite
> his
> | admonishions to the contrary. This decision, to marry for honor rather
> than
> | love, was a turning point in his life. He was then almost required to
go
> | into a series of meaningless, menial, low paying jobs to support himself
> and
> | his family. When his marraige inevitably imploded, he was left with
> little
> | option but to go into the army, which provided him with steady income
that
> | he otherwise would not have been able to count on, given his education
> | level.
> |
> | Quite frankly, I've never respected his decision to join the military.
It
> | was done out of necessity rather than desire. He had precious few
> choices,
> | and of his available options, he chose military service. It was stupid,
> if
> | you ask me. He's simply too smart to have gone into the military.
> However,
> | his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by the
> | military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say "uh,
> ok".
> | At this point in his life, it would be stupid to NOT avail himself of
the
> | only really marketable skill he has.
> |
> | And yes, I have plenty of respect for him, but not because he joined the
> | army and became a mechanic. Rather, it's DESPITE the fact that he
joined
> | the army and became a mechanic. He knows how I feel on the subjects,
and
> | appreciates my position.
> |
> | --
> | Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
> | It's not a god complex when you're always right
> |
> |
> |
>
>




01 Jun 2004 13:42:02
z
Re: OT: mechanics are good to have as friends

"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in
news:[email protected]:

>
> Total cost: $130 in parts, $20 in beer, and my '91 (ex)shitmobile is
> now purring like a kitten. To get all that stuff done at a garage
> would probably have run me upwards of $600 or more(don't even want to
> GUESS how much it would be). Suffice it to say, if you have a friend
> who is a mechanic, make use of his services!
>

thats cool dude. I've got a mechanic buddy who keeps my stuff running in
exchange for me keeping his computers going. Man a few weeks ago the
computer that keeps track of the fuel tank levels at the station went tits
up. I think that thing went in sometime in the mid 80's -- we eventually
got it going right again - CMOS battery failed.

So this weekend my old 70 ford won't go into gear -- guess who's getting a
call :)

-z


01 Jun 2004 15:25:35
Jeff Goslin
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

"-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> would have had other options than a mechanic. The military doesn't assign
or
> force someone into any particular job class. This just shows either you
> don't know what you're talking about, or he's feeding you a line of
> bullshit. He would of had to of taken the ASVAB and according to what he

Maybe he did...??? He told me that the army assigns you a job after basic
training, which sounded fairly reasonable to me. After all, if the army
didn't assign jobs to people, everyone would say, "I wanna be a chopper
pilot!" and nobody would want to do the grunt work. You're telling me that
they actually have options about what they want to do?

I obviously have no direct experience in this, but I do recall a certain
scene from "Full Metal Jacket" where they were assigning people to jobs at
the end of boot camp... "BASIC MILITARY JOURNALISM??? You gotta be shittin
me Joker, you're not a writer, you're a killer!" That situation sounded
more or less appropriate for the armed forces. Not everyone can be the same
thing in the military.

> Just out of curiousity where and what unit was he stationed with?

I don't know his unit numbers or anything, but he was in Korea, then
Germany, then he went to Fort Knox, then to... somewhere in tennessee?

--
Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
It's not a god complex when you're always right





01 Jun 2004 15:34:41
Jeff Goslin
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

"Jose" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> ASVAB score aside, you will be assigned a job depending on the
requirements
> of the service. If you don't like it, tough. Re-classing is not as easy
as
> you make it out to be. It requires a whole new run of schooling and the


I further assumed that as well. Sure, if someone had some MAJOR problem,
like, say, they developed an allergy to petroleum products, they might be
moved out of their job, but if they simply didn't like their job, that was
not a good enough reason to get the army to switch your job. They have that
whole "orders" thing, and if you are ordered to be a mechanic, well, there's
not much you can do about it.

He did feed me one line of bullshit which I thought could be nothing BUT
bullshit. He tried to tell me that he did not want to get an advancement to
some rank(I want to say Sergeant?) because to do so would cause him to go
high enough up into the chain of command where he would have to start doing
all sorts of paperwork and stuff. I truly felt that this was his particular
way of dealing with being "passed over" for promotion. I can't remember
what rank he had at the end, but it wasn't very high up. I think he did
just enough to get things done, and nothing more, and that's why he didn't
get promoted. He tried to tell me that at this rank that he "didn't want to
get", you start being like actively responsible for so much stuff, for so
little pay, that it's not worth it, and that's why he didn't want to be
promoted. But, being his friend, I simply went along with it, and nodded
and smiled, "whatever you say, dude."

--
Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
It's not a god complex when you're always right





01 Jun 2004 19:35:34
Denise Anderson
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends


"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > would have had other options than a mechanic. The military doesn't
assign
> or
> > force someone into any particular job class. This just shows either you
> > don't know what you're talking about, or he's feeding you a line of
> > bullshit. He would of had to of taken the ASVAB and according to what he
>
> Maybe he did...??? He told me that the army assigns you a job after basic
> training, which sounded fairly reasonable to me.

When I was being recruited by the Army I took my ASVAB and got a 98. They
then gave me a list of all the jobs I could choose with a score that high,
pretty much any job. I was to choose something like 3 jobs off the list and
after basic whatever school had openings would be the school I got.. it may
or may not be from the list I had submitted, but they couldn't promise me a
specific job (which is basically why I ended up in the Navy.)

Denise




01 Jun 2004 19:56:44
-=GriFter=-
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

I was in the Army for 5 years (95-00). I ended as an E4-p (Cpl) and had
graduated from every school that they threw at me for my first 2 years in.
My time was spent w/ Fco 51st Inf LRSC, 2nd Plt Tm 5. Without opening my
entire 201 file we did various tours and missions as well.

After I took my ASVAB I had pretty much any job to choose from. The few I
had to choose from that were currently available at that time without me
putting off my enlistment were 97E - Human Intelligence Collector
(Interrogator / Linguist), 31B - Military Police, and 11B - Infantryman
(Grunt). I asked my recruiter to kind of explain the differences between the
jobs and when he told me that 11B is basically the "Rambo" of the military
that's what I ended up choosing. I had to go to Combat Skills basic training
which differs from other basic trainings due to being only male and still
living in very large bays of around 30 or so men. Of course after basic I
went through AIT which didn't move us from Ft. Benning.

It sounded like I was saying that mechanics were dumbases but I did have
much respect for the guys that worked in our motorpool, keeping all those
vehicles running after the shit we put them through was no easy task. I was
simply trying to proove a point that if he is saying that he was assigned
the job of being a mechanic he was either too lazy to pick something else,
or was screwed by his recruiter. My recruiter was cool as hell and was just
getting ready to end his tour as a recruiter and go back to his perminent
duty station, so he didn't care if I joined or not and pretty much told me
all of my options and not just what he needed to fullfill his numbers.

Any more questions, I'll be happy to answer them. Sorry this is kind of
choppy but I am expecting company.
--


-=GriFter=-




"Jose" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
| ASVAB score aside, you will be assigned a job depending on the
requirements
| of the service. If you don't like it, tough. Re-classing is not as easy
as
| you make it out to be. It requires a whole new run of schooling and the
| military is not hip to spend money on people during peace time. Also,
| mechanic is not a "dumb ass" job. Truck driver is definitely low level,
but
| it takes mechanical aptitude and (depending on the level of mechanic you
are
| at) a fair amount of knowledge and intelligence to understand the
| electrical/mechanical assemblies you deal with. Based on what you are
| saying, I am assuming you are not a mechanic.
|
| If you were in the service, may I ask which one and what you job class
was?
|
|
| Jose
|
|
| "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
| news:[email protected]
| > *snip*
| > However,
| > his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by the
| > military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say "uh,
| ok".
| > *snip*
| >
| > This is complete hogwash. If this guy is as smart as you say he is than
he
| > would have had other options than a mechanic. The military doesn't
assign
| or
| > force someone into any particular job class. This just shows either you
| > don't know what you're talking about, or he's feeding you a line of
| > bullshit. He would of had to of taken the ASVAB and according to what he
| > would have scored on that test would have shown him what he was eligible
| > for. Normally the mechanic and truck driver are reserved for the
complete
| > dumbassses who barely pass the test, the ones who don't pass the test
are
| > referred to the Marines. Anywho, he didn't get drafted and if he didn't
| like
| > being a mechanic he could of reclassed to another job class. Being a
| > mechanic was his own choice, and I can guarantee you it wasn't "forced"
by
| > any means.
| >
| > Just out of curiousity where and what unit was he stationed with?
| > --
| >
| >
| > -=GriFter=-
| >
| >
| > "Jeff Goslin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > news:[email protected]
| > | "LCT Paintball" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > | news:a%[email protected]_s51...
| > | > That's interesting. It seems your best friend is, according to your
| > views,
| > | > probably one of the dumbest people on earth. You know, in the
| military,
| > | AND
| > | > a mechanic. You must have a lot of respect for him! ;)
| > |
| > | Worse than that, actually. His life choices essentially put him where
| he
| > | is, which is what I've been saying all along. His position in life
only
| > | serves to reinforce my viewpoint. He's one of the smartest guys I
know,
| > yet
| > | he made one incredibly dumb decision. He decided to have sex without
| > | protection with a girl, and now has a daughter because of it.
| > |
| > | His biggest problem is "honor without intelligence". He's so worried
| > about
| > | "doing the right thing" that he doesn't do the smart thing, even
though
| he
| > | knows what the smart thing is. He should not have married the girl he
| > did,
| > | simply because she was pregnant, and EVERYONE knew it, even him,
despite
| > his
| > | admonishions to the contrary. This decision, to marry for honor
rather
| > than
| > | love, was a turning point in his life. He was then almost required to
| go
| > | into a series of meaningless, menial, low paying jobs to support
himself
| > and
| > | his family. When his marraige inevitably imploded, he was left with
| > little
| > | option but to go into the army, which provided him with steady income
| that
| > | he otherwise would not have been able to count on, given his education
| > | level.
| > |
| > | Quite frankly, I've never respected his decision to join the military.
| It
| > | was done out of necessity rather than desire. He had precious few
| > choices,
| > | and of his available options, he chose military service. It was
stupid,
| > if
| > | you ask me. He's simply too smart to have gone into the military.
| > However,
| > | his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by
the
| > | military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say "uh,
| > ok".
| > | At this point in his life, it would be stupid to NOT avail himself of
| the
| > | only really marketable skill he has.
| > |
| > | And yes, I have plenty of respect for him, but not because he joined
the
| > | army and became a mechanic. Rather, it's DESPITE the fact that he
| joined
| > | the army and became a mechanic. He knows how I feel on the subjects,
| and
| > | appreciates my position.
| > |
| > | --
| > | Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
| > | It's not a god complex when you're always right
| > |
| > |
| > |
| >
| >
|
|




01 Jun 2004 20:57:21
Denise Anderson
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends


"-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I was in the Army for 5 years (95-00). I ended as an E4-p (Cpl) and had
> graduated from every school that they threw at me for my first 2 years in.
> My time was spent w/ Fco 51st Inf LRSC, 2nd Plt Tm 5. Without opening my
> entire 201 file we did various tours and missions as well.
>
> After I took my ASVAB I had pretty much any job to choose from. The few I
> had to choose from that were currently available at that time without me
> putting off my enlistment were 97E - Human Intelligence Collector
> (Interrogator / Linguist

You should have taken the 97E, you could have been at school with me.

Denise




01 Jun 2004 15:04:00
Jose
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

I was in the Corps and was a mechanic. I got screwed on my schooling, so
when I started making noise about getting the additional training I was
supposed to get, they discharged me because of my bad knee. Cheaper to get
rid of me than to fix my knee and finish my schooling, I guess.

I can tell you that all it takes is one dumb ass to screw up your training
and career pathing. They shorted me on my second set of schooling (combat
vehicle recovery) and I never managed to get them to make good on my
contract.

The contract is the key issue nowadays. If you sign on and leave the
specific job open to choice of the military you will have no control over
what your final career assignment will be. In other words, sure you will be
a mechanic, but you will be the maintenance mechanic/driver. Or sure you
will be infantry, but you are the guy who protects the latrines. If you
make sure that the contract clearly states a specific MOS (all 4 digits, not
just the 3 guaranteeing a job field), then you can fight for your career
training or release if the service balks. I can definitely see a guy
getting screwed over by his recruiter, because I saw it happen.

Keep in mind that when you go through training the infantry guys build a
real grunt-centric image of the service for the new recruit. Every Marine
goes through boot, plus another month at the USMC AIT school to get more
acquainted with infantry equipment and tactics. It's said every Marine is a
rifleman FIRST. The grunt Staff Sgt. who led our platoon had the view that
EVERYTHING exists to serve or support the grunt, so the grunt is the single
most important thing in the service. Personally, I don't think it takes
much smarts to be a grunt, but it does take a lot of dedication and training
so that you react the right way to get things done and not get killed. Now
Special Forces, Force Recon and SEAL is a different story. That is a much
more thinking group of people and being dumb gets you killed there. As far
as needing smarts, I think fighter piloting and high level (like Battallion
and higher) leadership really takes the most brains to do well. Patton
might have been crazy, but no-one denies that he was one smart sumbitch.

Based on what Jeff has said so far, it sounds to me like his buddy wouldn't
have done a very good job of CYA anywho.

Jose




"-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I was in the Army for 5 years (95-00). I ended as an E4-p (Cpl) and had
> graduated from every school that they threw at me for my first 2 years in.
> My time was spent w/ Fco 51st Inf LRSC, 2nd Plt Tm 5. Without opening my
> entire 201 file we did various tours and missions as well.
>
> After I took my ASVAB I had pretty much any job to choose from. The few I
> had to choose from that were currently available at that time without me
> putting off my enlistment were 97E - Human Intelligence Collector
> (Interrogator / Linguist), 31B - Military Police, and 11B - Infantryman
> (Grunt). I asked my recruiter to kind of explain the differences between
the
> jobs and when he told me that 11B is basically the "Rambo" of the military
> that's what I ended up choosing. I had to go to Combat Skills basic
training
> which differs from other basic trainings due to being only male and still
> living in very large bays of around 30 or so men. Of course after basic I
> went through AIT which didn't move us from Ft. Benning.
>
> It sounded like I was saying that mechanics were dumbases but I did have
> much respect for the guys that worked in our motorpool, keeping all those
> vehicles running after the shit we put them through was no easy task. I
was
> simply trying to proove a point that if he is saying that he was assigned
> the job of being a mechanic he was either too lazy to pick something else,
> or was screwed by his recruiter. My recruiter was cool as hell and was
just
> getting ready to end his tour as a recruiter and go back to his perminent
> duty station, so he didn't care if I joined or not and pretty much told me
> all of my options and not just what he needed to fullfill his numbers.
>
> Any more questions, I'll be happy to answer them. Sorry this is kind of
> choppy but I am expecting company.
> --
>
>
> -=GriFter=-
>
>
>
>
> "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> | ASVAB score aside, you will be assigned a job depending on the
> requirements
> | of the service. If you don't like it, tough. Re-classing is not as
easy
> as
> | you make it out to be. It requires a whole new run of schooling and the
> | military is not hip to spend money on people during peace time. Also,
> | mechanic is not a "dumb ass" job. Truck driver is definitely low level,
> but
> | it takes mechanical aptitude and (depending on the level of mechanic you
> are
> | at) a fair amount of knowledge and intelligence to understand the
> | electrical/mechanical assemblies you deal with. Based on what you are
> | saying, I am assuming you are not a mechanic.
> |
> | If you were in the service, may I ask which one and what you job class
> was?
> |
> |
> | Jose
> |
> |
> | "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | news:[email protected]
> | > *snip*
> | > However,
> | > his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by
the
> | > military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say "uh,
> | ok".
> | > *snip*
> | >
> | > This is complete hogwash. If this guy is as smart as you say he is
than
> he
> | > would have had other options than a mechanic. The military doesn't
> assign
> | or
> | > force someone into any particular job class. This just shows either
you
> | > don't know what you're talking about, or he's feeding you a line of
> | > bullshit. He would of had to of taken the ASVAB and according to what
he
> | > would have scored on that test would have shown him what he was
eligible
> | > for. Normally the mechanic and truck driver are reserved for the
> complete
> | > dumbassses who barely pass the test, the ones who don't pass the test
> are
> | > referred to the Marines. Anywho, he didn't get drafted and if he
didn't
> | like
> | > being a mechanic he could of reclassed to another job class. Being a
> | > mechanic was his own choice, and I can guarantee you it wasn't
"forced"
> by
> | > any means.
> | >
> | > Just out of curiousity where and what unit was he stationed with?
> | > --
> | >
> | >
> | > -=GriFter=-
> | >
> | >
> | > "Jeff Goslin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | > news:[email protected]
> | > | "LCT Paintball" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | > | news:a%[email protected]_s51...
> | > | > That's interesting. It seems your best friend is, according to
your
> | > views,
> | > | > probably one of the dumbest people on earth. You know, in the
> | military,
> | > | AND
> | > | > a mechanic. You must have a lot of respect for him! ;)
> | > |
> | > | Worse than that, actually. His life choices essentially put him
where
> | he
> | > | is, which is what I've been saying all along. His position in life
> only
> | > | serves to reinforce my viewpoint. He's one of the smartest guys I
> know,
> | > yet
> | > | he made one incredibly dumb decision. He decided to have sex
without
> | > | protection with a girl, and now has a daughter because of it.
> | > |
> | > | His biggest problem is "honor without intelligence". He's so
worried
> | > about
> | > | "doing the right thing" that he doesn't do the smart thing, even
> though
> | he
> | > | knows what the smart thing is. He should not have married the girl
he
> | > did,
> | > | simply because she was pregnant, and EVERYONE knew it, even him,
> despite
> | > his
> | > | admonishions to the contrary. This decision, to marry for honor
> rather
> | > than
> | > | love, was a turning point in his life. He was then almost required
to
> | go
> | > | into a series of meaningless, menial, low paying jobs to support
> himself
> | > and
> | > | his family. When his marraige inevitably imploded, he was left with
> | > little
> | > | option but to go into the army, which provided him with steady
income
> | that
> | > | he otherwise would not have been able to count on, given his
education
> | > | level.
> | > |
> | > | Quite frankly, I've never respected his decision to join the
military.
> | It
> | > | was done out of necessity rather than desire. He had precious few
> | > choices,
> | > | and of his available options, he chose military service. It was
> stupid,
> | > if
> | > | you ask me. He's simply too smart to have gone into the military.
> | > However,
> | > | his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by
> the
> | > | military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say
"uh,
> | > ok".
> | > | At this point in his life, it would be stupid to NOT avail himself
of
> | the
> | > | only really marketable skill he has.
> | > |
> | > | And yes, I have plenty of respect for him, but not because he joined
> the
> | > | army and became a mechanic. Rather, it's DESPITE the fact that he
> | joined
> | > | the army and became a mechanic. He knows how I feel on the
subjects,
> | and
> | > | appreciates my position.
> | > |
> | > | --
> | > | Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
> | > | It's not a god complex when you're always right
> | > |
> | > |
> | > |
> | >
> | >
> |
> |
>
>




01 Jun 2004 15:27:21
Jose
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends




"Jeff Goslin" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > ASVAB score aside, you will be assigned a job depending on the
> requirements
> > of the service. If you don't like it, tough. Re-classing is not as
easy
> as
> > you make it out to be. It requires a whole new run of schooling and the
>
>
> I further assumed that as well. Sure, if someone had some MAJOR problem,
> like, say, they developed an allergy to petroleum products, they might be
> moved out of their job, but if they simply didn't like their job, that was
> not a good enough reason to get the army to switch your job. They have
that
> whole "orders" thing, and if you are ordered to be a mechanic, well,
there's
> not much you can do about it.
>
> He did feed me one line of bullshit which I thought could be nothing BUT
> bullshit. He tried to tell me that he did not want to get an advancement
to
> some rank(I want to say Sergeant?) because to do so would cause him to go
> high enough up into the chain of command where he would have to start
doing
> all sorts of paperwork and stuff. I truly felt that this was his
particular
> way of dealing with being "passed over" for promotion. I can't remember
> what rank he had at the end, but it wasn't very high up. I think he did
> just enough to get things done, and nothing more, and that's why he didn't
> get promoted. He tried to tell me that at this rank that he "didn't want
to
> get", you start being like actively responsible for so much stuff, for so
> little pay, that it's not worth it, and that's why he didn't want to be
> promoted. But, being his friend, I simply went along with it, and nodded
> and smiled, "whatever you say, dude."
>
> --
> Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
> It's not a god complex when you're always right


Once you get to NCO things do change, but usually for the better. I don't
know about the whole paperwork thing. Usually, E-4 or E-5 (Sgt. or Staff
Sgt.) is dangled as the carrot for re-enlistment and not seen as some kind
of downgrade. I think you're right about the bullshit-o-meter pegging on
that one.

Jose




01 Jun 2004 22:56:49
Phelps
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

In article <[email protected] >,
"Jose" <[email protected] > wrote:

> I was in the Corps and was a mechanic. I got screwed on my schooling, so
> when I started making noise about getting the additional training I was
> supposed to get, they discharged me because of my bad knee. Cheaper to get
> rid of me than to fix my knee and finish my schooling, I guess.

That's beginning to be a familiar story (getting screwed on
schooling.) I know a kid who went into the army on a written guarantee
that he would get flight school (Blackhawks). He started out as a
Blackhawk mechanic, and they kept missing his training deadlines until
he wasn't going to make his committment if he didn't get into flight
school right then (he would not be able to get the pilot service time in
without a reup.)

He told them, "I have it in writing, I want to go to flight school."
They said, tough titty, you aren't going, there's a war on. He ended up
negotiating a discharge without condition for material misrepresentation
during recruitment (on the part of the Army.)

--
Phelps <http://www.donotremove.netcolor=#0000FF> >
"You better slap a muzzle on that scaled down piece of evil." -- Space Ghost


02 Jun 2004 02:08:50
-=GriFter=-
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

Did you go the linguist route as well? If so when did you spend time in
Monteray? My wife was a 97E as well and if memory serves spent a year at DLI
in 96.

Where did you end up at your perminant party station?
--


-=GriFter=-


"Denise Anderson" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
|
| "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
| news:[email protected]
| > I was in the Army for 5 years (95-00). I ended as an E4-p (Cpl) and had
| > graduated from every school that they threw at me for my first 2 years
in.
| > My time was spent w/ Fco 51st Inf LRSC, 2nd Plt Tm 5. Without opening my
| > entire 201 file we did various tours and missions as well.
| >
| > After I took my ASVAB I had pretty much any job to choose from. The few
I
| > had to choose from that were currently available at that time without me
| > putting off my enlistment were 97E - Human Intelligence Collector
| > (Interrogator / Linguist
|
| You should have taken the 97E, you could have been at school with me.
|
| Denise
|
|




02 Jun 2004 02:20:03
-=GriFter=-
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

I don't know how the whole recruiting and schooling thing goes for the USMC,
I'm mostly speaking for the Army since that's what I know first hand.
Reclassing isn't as difficult as you may think, I nearly reclassed once
during my enlistment but decided not to at the last minute. I took the tests
and interviews for an 89D (eod) and was going to be accepted into the unit
when my original unit offered me a promotion to stay.

I agree that grunts don't need many brains to function, lucky for me I got
into a Special Ops unit after I graduated Ranger school at Ft. Bragg, so I
wasn't the everyday usual grunt. When I went through boot I think it was 13
or 14 weeks and another 5-7 weeks after that for AIT.

The only real reason that I said anything to begin with is just that I'm
tired of people blaming the Army for their own mistaken career choice.
--

-=GriFter=-

"Smack a taser on his nuts until his pubes fall out!"


"Jose" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
| I was in the Corps and was a mechanic. I got screwed on my schooling, so
| when I started making noise about getting the additional training I was
| supposed to get, they discharged me because of my bad knee. Cheaper to
get
| rid of me than to fix my knee and finish my schooling, I guess.
|
| I can tell you that all it takes is one dumb ass to screw up your training
| and career pathing. They shorted me on my second set of schooling (combat
| vehicle recovery) and I never managed to get them to make good on my
| contract.
|
| The contract is the key issue nowadays. If you sign on and leave the
| specific job open to choice of the military you will have no control over
| what your final career assignment will be. In other words, sure you will
be
| a mechanic, but you will be the maintenance mechanic/driver. Or sure you
| will be infantry, but you are the guy who protects the latrines. If you
| make sure that the contract clearly states a specific MOS (all 4 digits,
not
| just the 3 guaranteeing a job field), then you can fight for your career
| training or release if the service balks. I can definitely see a guy
| getting screwed over by his recruiter, because I saw it happen.
|
| Keep in mind that when you go through training the infantry guys build a
| real grunt-centric image of the service for the new recruit. Every Marine
| goes through boot, plus another month at the USMC AIT school to get more
| acquainted with infantry equipment and tactics. It's said every Marine is
a
| rifleman FIRST. The grunt Staff Sgt. who led our platoon had the view
that
| EVERYTHING exists to serve or support the grunt, so the grunt is the
single
| most important thing in the service. Personally, I don't think it takes
| much smarts to be a grunt, but it does take a lot of dedication and
training
| so that you react the right way to get things done and not get killed.
Now
| Special Forces, Force Recon and SEAL is a different story. That is a much
| more thinking group of people and being dumb gets you killed there. As
far
| as needing smarts, I think fighter piloting and high level (like
Battallion
| and higher) leadership really takes the most brains to do well. Patton
| might have been crazy, but no-one denies that he was one smart sumbitch.
|
| Based on what Jeff has said so far, it sounds to me like his buddy
wouldn't
| have done a very good job of CYA anywho.
|
| Jose
|
|
|
|
| "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
| news:[email protected]
| > I was in the Army for 5 years (95-00). I ended as an E4-p (Cpl) and had
| > graduated from every school that they threw at me for my first 2 years
in.
| > My time was spent w/ Fco 51st Inf LRSC, 2nd Plt Tm 5. Without opening my
| > entire 201 file we did various tours and missions as well.
| >
| > After I took my ASVAB I had pretty much any job to choose from. The few
I
| > had to choose from that were currently available at that time without me
| > putting off my enlistment were 97E - Human Intelligence Collector
| > (Interrogator / Linguist), 31B - Military Police, and 11B - Infantryman
| > (Grunt). I asked my recruiter to kind of explain the differences between
| the
| > jobs and when he told me that 11B is basically the "Rambo" of the
military
| > that's what I ended up choosing. I had to go to Combat Skills basic
| training
| > which differs from other basic trainings due to being only male and
still
| > living in very large bays of around 30 or so men. Of course after basic
I
| > went through AIT which didn't move us from Ft. Benning.
| >
| > It sounded like I was saying that mechanics were dumbases but I did have
| > much respect for the guys that worked in our motorpool, keeping all
those
| > vehicles running after the shit we put them through was no easy task. I
| was
| > simply trying to proove a point that if he is saying that he was
assigned
| > the job of being a mechanic he was either too lazy to pick something
else,
| > or was screwed by his recruiter. My recruiter was cool as hell and was
| just
| > getting ready to end his tour as a recruiter and go back to his
perminent
| > duty station, so he didn't care if I joined or not and pretty much told
me
| > all of my options and not just what he needed to fullfill his numbers.
| >
| > Any more questions, I'll be happy to answer them. Sorry this is kind of
| > choppy but I am expecting company.
| > --
| >
| >
| > -=GriFter=-
| >
| >
| >
| >
| > "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > news:[email protected]
| > | ASVAB score aside, you will be assigned a job depending on the
| > requirements
| > | of the service. If you don't like it, tough. Re-classing is not as
| easy
| > as
| > | you make it out to be. It requires a whole new run of schooling and
the
| > | military is not hip to spend money on people during peace time. Also,
| > | mechanic is not a "dumb ass" job. Truck driver is definitely low
level,
| > but
| > | it takes mechanical aptitude and (depending on the level of mechanic
you
| > are
| > | at) a fair amount of knowledge and intelligence to understand the
| > | electrical/mechanical assemblies you deal with. Based on what you are
| > | saying, I am assuming you are not a mechanic.
| > |
| > | If you were in the service, may I ask which one and what you job class
| > was?
| > |
| > |
| > | Jose
| > |
| > |
| > | "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > | news:[email protected]
| > | > *snip*
| > | > However,
| > | > his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him by
| the
| > | > military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say
"uh,
| > | ok".
| > | > *snip*
| > | >
| > | > This is complete hogwash. If this guy is as smart as you say he is
| than
| > he
| > | > would have had other options than a mechanic. The military doesn't
| > assign
| > | or
| > | > force someone into any particular job class. This just shows either
| you
| > | > don't know what you're talking about, or he's feeding you a line of
| > | > bullshit. He would of had to of taken the ASVAB and according to
what
| he
| > | > would have scored on that test would have shown him what he was
| eligible
| > | > for. Normally the mechanic and truck driver are reserved for the
| > complete
| > | > dumbassses who barely pass the test, the ones who don't pass the
test
| > are
| > | > referred to the Marines. Anywho, he didn't get drafted and if he
| didn't
| > | like
| > | > being a mechanic he could of reclassed to another job class. Being a
| > | > mechanic was his own choice, and I can guarantee you it wasn't
| "forced"
| > by
| > | > any means.
| > | >
| > | > Just out of curiousity where and what unit was he stationed with?
| > | > --
| > | >
| > | >
| > | > -=GriFter=-
| > | >
| > | >
| > | > "Jeff Goslin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > | > news:[email protected]
| > | > | "LCT Paintball" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > | > | news:a%[email protected]_s51...
| > | > | > That's interesting. It seems your best friend is, according to
| your
| > | > views,
| > | > | > probably one of the dumbest people on earth. You know, in the
| > | military,
| > | > | AND
| > | > | > a mechanic. You must have a lot of respect for him! ;)
| > | > |
| > | > | Worse than that, actually. His life choices essentially put him
| where
| > | he
| > | > | is, which is what I've been saying all along. His position in
life
| > only
| > | > | serves to reinforce my viewpoint. He's one of the smartest guys I
| > know,
| > | > yet
| > | > | he made one incredibly dumb decision. He decided to have sex
| without
| > | > | protection with a girl, and now has a daughter because of it.
| > | > |
| > | > | His biggest problem is "honor without intelligence". He's so
| worried
| > | > about
| > | > | "doing the right thing" that he doesn't do the smart thing, even
| > though
| > | he
| > | > | knows what the smart thing is. He should not have married the
girl
| he
| > | > did,
| > | > | simply because she was pregnant, and EVERYONE knew it, even him,
| > despite
| > | > his
| > | > | admonishions to the contrary. This decision, to marry for honor
| > rather
| > | > than
| > | > | love, was a turning point in his life. He was then almost
required
| to
| > | go
| > | > | into a series of meaningless, menial, low paying jobs to support
| > himself
| > | > and
| > | > | his family. When his marraige inevitably imploded, he was left
with
| > | > little
| > | > | option but to go into the army, which provided him with steady
| income
| > | that
| > | > | he otherwise would not have been able to count on, given his
| education
| > | > | level.
| > | > |
| > | > | Quite frankly, I've never respected his decision to join the
| military.
| > | It
| > | > | was done out of necessity rather than desire. He had precious few
| > | > choices,
| > | > | and of his available options, he chose military service. It was
| > stupid,
| > | > if
| > | > | you ask me. He's simply too smart to have gone into the military.
| > | > However,
| > | > | his "decision" to become a mechanic was actually forced upon him
by
| > the
| > | > | military. "You're going to do this" they said, and he HAD to say
| "uh,
| > | > ok".
| > | > | At this point in his life, it would be stupid to NOT avail himself
| of
| > | the
| > | > | only really marketable skill he has.
| > | > |
| > | > | And yes, I have plenty of respect for him, but not because he
joined
| > the
| > | > | army and became a mechanic. Rather, it's DESPITE the fact that he
| > | joined
| > | > | the army and became a mechanic. He knows how I feel on the
| subjects,
| > | and
| > | > | appreciates my position.
| > | > |
| > | > | --
| > | > | Jeff Goslin - MCSD - www.goslin.info
| > | > | It's not a god complex when you're always right
| > | > |
| > | > |
| > | > |
| > | >
| > | >
| > |
| > |
| >
| >
|
|




02 Jun 2004 04:19:43
Denise Anderson
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends


"-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Did you go the linguist route as well? If so when did you spend time in
> Monteray? My wife was a 97E as well and if memory serves spent a year at
DLI
> in 96.
>
> Where did you end up at your perminant party station?
> --
>
>
> -=GriFter=-


I was at DLI from 97 on... what language did she study? I was Navy.

Denise


Denise




01 Jun 2004 21:25:36
Jose
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends


>
> The only real reason that I said anything to begin with is just that I'm
> tired of people blaming the Army for their own mistaken career choice.
> --
>
> -=GriFter=-
>
> "Smack a taser on his nuts until his pubes fall out!"
>


Agreed. You MUST be aware of what career path you want to take, or the path
of least resistance is likely to put you in the shittiest job. Re-classing
in the Corps is probably tougher because we are smaller and always get less
money than any other service. As such, getting a totally different career
is tough. Sounds like EOD might be a variant of an 03XX career path? We
could lateral more easily, but going outside the MOS field was tough. I
asked and was told that grunt classifications were easier to change to than
anything fancy, like helo pilot.

Jose




02 Jun 2004 14:58:02
-=GriFter=-
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

She studied Spanish and was in the Army. We both joined in 95 and after she
was done with basic left for DLI I think at the end of 95 so I think maybe
she would have been gone by the time you got there. We got married in 96
when I flew out there on a long weekend and proposed, we than drove to Lake
Tahoe with a bunch of her friends and got married that weekend.
--


-=GriFter=-


"Denise Anderson" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
|
| "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
| news:[email protected]
| > Did you go the linguist route as well? If so when did you spend time in
| > Monteray? My wife was a 97E as well and if memory serves spent a year at
| DLI
| > in 96.
| >
| > Where did you end up at your perminant party station?
| > --
| >
| >
| > -=GriFter=-
|
|
| I was at DLI from 97 on... what language did she study? I was Navy.
|
| Denise
|
|
| Denise
|
|




02 Jun 2004 15:12:29
-=GriFter=-
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

Our job identifiers were only 3 digits and anything after that signified any
extra schooling that you had gone through. For example if I remember right
when I got out my MOS identifier was 11B-2PVWX........I think those are
right.

Here's what they stand for (if you care):
11B - Infantryman
2 - Had to do with rank e1-e4 was 1 and e4p-whatever was 2
P - Airborne
V - Ranger
W - HALO
X - SCUBA (Army not Navy SCUBA)---I don't remember if that was x or z

Anyway, that helps to describe how the Army's job identifier works and than
additional special quaification identifier. I'm sure there was more for
other schools I went through but to tell you the truth I don't remember them
all and I'm too lazy to dig out my 201 file.

Sorry for nearly putting you to sleep, I know how exciting that was.
--


-=GriFter=-


"Jose" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
|
| >
| > The only real reason that I said anything to begin with is just that I'm
| > tired of people blaming the Army for their own mistaken career choice.
| > --
| >
|
-=GriFter=-
| >
| > "Smack a taser on his nuts until his pubes fall out!"
| >
|
|
| Agreed. You MUST be aware of what career path you want to take, or the
path
| of least resistance is likely to put you in the shittiest job.
Re-classing
| in the Corps is probably tougher because we are smaller and always get
less
| money than any other service. As such, getting a totally different career
| is tough. Sounds like EOD might be a variant of an 03XX career path? We
| could lateral more easily, but going outside the MOS field was tough. I
| asked and was told that grunt classifications were easier to change to
than
| anything fancy, like helo pilot.
|
| Jose
|
|




02 Jun 2004 11:53:08
Jose
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

You got all the fun training. I was all set to request transfer to the
Force Recon unit in Reno (my buddy had transferred there already from my
unit and put in a good word for me with the CO) and go back for all the
infrantry training when the whole contract/knee issue came to a head for me.
Turned out for the best. Instead of going back for more training, I met my
(now) wife right after I was discharged.

Jose

"-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Our job identifiers were only 3 digits and anything after that signified
any
> extra schooling that you had gone through. For example if I remember right
> when I got out my MOS identifier was 11B-2PVWX........I think those are
> right.
>
> Here's what they stand for (if you care):
> 11B - Infantryman
> 2 - Had to do with rank e1-e4 was 1 and e4p-whatever was 2
> P - Airborne
> V - Ranger
> W - HALO
> X - SCUBA (Army not Navy SCUBA)---I don't remember if that was x or z
>
> Anyway, that helps to describe how the Army's job identifier works and
than
> additional special quaification identifier. I'm sure there was more for
> other schools I went through but to tell you the truth I don't remember
them
> all and I'm too lazy to dig out my 201 file.
>
> Sorry for nearly putting you to sleep, I know how exciting that was.
> --
>
>
> -=GriFter=-
>
>
> "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> |
> | >
> | > The only real reason that I said anything to begin with is just that
I'm
> | > tired of people blaming the Army for their own mistaken career choice.
> | > --
> | >
> |
> -=GriFter=-
> | >
> | > "Smack a taser on his nuts until his pubes fall out!"
> | >
> |
> |
> | Agreed. You MUST be aware of what career path you want to take, or the
> path
> | of least resistance is likely to put you in the shittiest job.
> Re-classing
> | in the Corps is probably tougher because we are smaller and always get
> less
> | money than any other service. As such, getting a totally different
career
> | is tough. Sounds like EOD might be a variant of an 03XX career path?
We
> | could lateral more easily, but going outside the MOS field was tough. I
> | asked and was told that grunt classifications were easier to change to
> than
> | anything fancy, like helo pilot.
> |
> | Jose
> |
> |
>
>




02 Jun 2004 21:17:14
-=GriFter=-
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

I'm sorry to hear about the meeting your wife thing. ;) One of the guys on
my team came from Force Recon. He was built like a brick shithouse, fought
in toughman competitions and was about 5' tall. I would never of wanted to
get into a brawl with him, but he was one of my best friends while I was in
and one of the nicest guys I've ever met. Marines aren't all bad as long as
you can get past their superiority complex.
--


-=GriFter=-


"Jose" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
| You got all the fun training. I was all set to request transfer to the
| Force Recon unit in Reno (my buddy had transferred there already from my
| unit and put in a good word for me with the CO) and go back for all the
| infrantry training when the whole contract/knee issue came to a head for
me.
| Turned out for the best. Instead of going back for more training, I met
my
| (now) wife right after I was discharged.
|
| Jose
|
| "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
| news:[email protected]
| > Our job identifiers were only 3 digits and anything after that signified
| any
| > extra schooling that you had gone through. For example if I remember
right
| > when I got out my MOS identifier was 11B-2PVWX........I think those are
| > right.
| >
| > Here's what they stand for (if you care):
| > 11B - Infantryman
| > 2 - Had to do with rank e1-e4 was 1 and e4p-whatever was 2
| > P - Airborne
| > V - Ranger
| > W - HALO
| > X - SCUBA (Army not Navy SCUBA)---I don't remember if that was x or z
| >
| > Anyway, that helps to describe how the Army's job identifier works and
| than
| > additional special quaification identifier. I'm sure there was more for
| > other schools I went through but to tell you the truth I don't remember
| them
| > all and I'm too lazy to dig out my 201 file.
| >
| > Sorry for nearly putting you to sleep, I know how exciting that was.
| > --
| >
| >
| > -=GriFter=-
| >
| >
| > "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > news:[email protected]
| > |
| > | >
| > | > The only real reason that I said anything to begin with is just that
| I'm
| > | > tired of people blaming the Army for their own mistaken career
choice.
| > | > --
| > | >
| > |
| > -=GriFter=-
| > | >
| > | > "Smack a taser on his nuts until his pubes fall out!"
| > | >
| > |
| > |
| > | Agreed. You MUST be aware of what career path you want to take, or
the
| > path
| > | of least resistance is likely to put you in the shittiest job.
| > Re-classing
| > | in the Corps is probably tougher because we are smaller and always get
| > less
| > | money than any other service. As such, getting a totally different
| career
| > | is tough. Sounds like EOD might be a variant of an 03XX career path?
| We
| > | could lateral more easily, but going outside the MOS field was tough.
I
| > | asked and was told that grunt classifications were easier to change to
| > than
| > | anything fancy, like helo pilot.
| > |
| > | Jose
| > |
| > |
| >
| >
|
|




02 Jun 2004 21:23:35
Jose
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

If there is one thing the Corps is good at, it is convincing guys they're
Superman. Some really are and the rest are an ass kicking waiting to
happen.

Jose


"-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I'm sorry to hear about the meeting your wife thing. ;) One of the guys
on
> my team came from Force Recon. He was built like a brick shithouse, fought
> in toughman competitions and was about 5' tall. I would never of wanted to
> get into a brawl with him, but he was one of my best friends while I was
in
> and one of the nicest guys I've ever met. Marines aren't all bad as long
as
> you can get past their superiority complex.
> --
>
>
> -=GriFter=-
>
>
> "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> | You got all the fun training. I was all set to request transfer to the
> | Force Recon unit in Reno (my buddy had transferred there already from my
> | unit and put in a good word for me with the CO) and go back for all the
> | infrantry training when the whole contract/knee issue came to a head for
> me.
> | Turned out for the best. Instead of going back for more training, I met
> my
> | (now) wife right after I was discharged.
> |
> | Jose
> |
> | "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | news:[email protected]
> | > Our job identifiers were only 3 digits and anything after that
signified
> | any
> | > extra schooling that you had gone through. For example if I remember
> right
> | > when I got out my MOS identifier was 11B-2PVWX........I think those
are
> | > right.
> | >
> | > Here's what they stand for (if you care):
> | > 11B - Infantryman
> | > 2 - Had to do with rank e1-e4 was 1 and e4p-whatever was 2
> | > P - Airborne
> | > V - Ranger
> | > W - HALO
> | > X - SCUBA (Army not Navy SCUBA)---I don't remember if that was x or z
> | >
> | > Anyway, that helps to describe how the Army's job identifier works and
> | than
> | > additional special quaification identifier. I'm sure there was more
for
> | > other schools I went through but to tell you the truth I don't
remember
> | them
> | > all and I'm too lazy to dig out my 201 file.
> | >
> | > Sorry for nearly putting you to sleep, I know how exciting that was.
> | > --
> | >
> | >
> | > -=GriFter=-
> | >
> | >
> | > "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | > news:[email protected]
> | > |
> | > | >
> | > | > The only real reason that I said anything to begin with is just
that
> | I'm
> | > | > tired of people blaming the Army for their own mistaken career
> choice.
> | > | > --
> | > | >
> | > |
> | > -=GriFter=-
> | > | >
> | > | > "Smack a taser on his nuts until his pubes fall out!"
> | > | >
> | > |
> | > |
> | > | Agreed. You MUST be aware of what career path you want to take, or
> the
> | > path
> | > | of least resistance is likely to put you in the shittiest job.
> | > Re-classing
> | > | in the Corps is probably tougher because we are smaller and always
get
> | > less
> | > | money than any other service. As such, getting a totally different
> | career
> | > | is tough. Sounds like EOD might be a variant of an 03XX career
path?
> | We
> | > | could lateral more easily, but going outside the MOS field was
tough.
> I
> | > | asked and was told that grunt classifications were easier to change
to
> | > than
> | > | anything fancy, like helo pilot.
> | > |
> | > | Jose
> | > |
> | > |
> | >
> | >
> |
> |
>
>




03 Jun 2004 11:56:22
-=GriFter=-
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

I'll drink to that!! ;)
--


-=GriFter=-


"Jose" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
| If there is one thing the Corps is good at, it is convincing guys they're
| Superman. Some really are and the rest are an ass kicking waiting to
| happen.
|
| Jose
|
|
| "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
| news:[email protected]
| > I'm sorry to hear about the meeting your wife thing. ;) One of the
guys
| on
| > my team came from Force Recon. He was built like a brick shithouse,
fought
| > in toughman competitions and was about 5' tall. I would never of wanted
to
| > get into a brawl with him, but he was one of my best friends while I was
| in
| > and one of the nicest guys I've ever met. Marines aren't all bad as long
| as
| > you can get past their superiority complex.
| > --
| >
| >
| > -=GriFter=-
| >
| >
| > "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > news:[email protected]
| > | You got all the fun training. I was all set to request transfer to
the
| > | Force Recon unit in Reno (my buddy had transferred there already from
my
| > | unit and put in a good word for me with the CO) and go back for all
the
| > | infrantry training when the whole contract/knee issue came to a head
for
| > me.
| > | Turned out for the best. Instead of going back for more training, I
met
| > my
| > | (now) wife right after I was discharged.
| > |
| > | Jose
| > |
| > | "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > | news:[email protected]
| > | > Our job identifiers were only 3 digits and anything after that
| signified
| > | any
| > | > extra schooling that you had gone through. For example if I remember
| > right
| > | > when I got out my MOS identifier was 11B-2PVWX........I think those
| are
| > | > right.
| > | >
| > | > Here's what they stand for (if you care):
| > | > 11B - Infantryman
| > | > 2 - Had to do with rank e1-e4 was 1 and e4p-whatever was 2
| > | > P - Airborne
| > | > V - Ranger
| > | > W - HALO
| > | > X - SCUBA (Army not Navy SCUBA)---I don't remember if that was x or
z
| > | >
| > | > Anyway, that helps to describe how the Army's job identifier works
and
| > | than
| > | > additional special quaification identifier. I'm sure there was more
| for
| > | > other schools I went through but to tell you the truth I don't
| remember
| > | them
| > | > all and I'm too lazy to dig out my 201 file.
| > | >
| > | > Sorry for nearly putting you to sleep, I know how exciting that was.
| > | > --
| > | >
| > | >
| > | > -=GriFter=-
| > | >
| > | >
| > | > "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
| > | > news:[email protected]
| > | > |
| > | > | >
| > | > | > The only real reason that I said anything to begin with is just
| that
| > | I'm
| > | > | > tired of people blaming the Army for their own mistaken career
| > choice.
| > | > | > --
| > | > | >
| > | > |
| > | > -=GriFter=-
| > | > | >
| > | > | > "Smack a taser on his nuts until his pubes fall out!"
| > | > | >
| > | > |
| > | > |
| > | > | Agreed. You MUST be aware of what career path you want to take,
or
| > the
| > | > path
| > | > | of least resistance is likely to put you in the shittiest job.
| > | > Re-classing
| > | > | in the Corps is probably tougher because we are smaller and always
| get
| > | > less
| > | > | money than any other service. As such, getting a totally
different
| > | career
| > | > | is tough. Sounds like EOD might be a variant of an 03XX career
| path?
| > | We
| > | > | could lateral more easily, but going outside the MOS field was
| tough.
| > I
| > | > | asked and was told that grunt classifications were easier to
change
| to
| > | > than
| > | > | anything fancy, like helo pilot.
| > | > |
| > | > | Jose
| > | > |
| > | > |
| > | >
| > | >
| > |
| > |
| >
| >
|
|




03 Jun 2004 08:09:24
Jose
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends

And I'll bring the newcastle. :-P

Jose


"-=GriFter=-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I'll drink to that!! ;)
> --
>
>
> -=GriFter=-
>
>
> "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> | If there is one thing the Corps is good at, it is convincing guys
they're
> | Superman. Some really are and the rest are an ass kicking waiting to
> | happen.
> |
> | Jose
> |
> |
> | "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | news:[email protected]
> | > I'm sorry to hear about the meeting your wife thing. ;) One of the
> guys
> | on
> | > my team came from Force Recon. He was built like a brick shithouse,
> fought
> | > in toughman competitions and was about 5' tall. I would never of
wanted
> to
> | > get into a brawl with him, but he was one of my best friends while I
was
> | in
> | > and one of the nicest guys I've ever met. Marines aren't all bad as
long
> | as
> | > you can get past their superiority complex.
> | > --
> | >
> | >
> | > -=GriFter=-
> | >
> | >
> | > "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | > news:[email protected]
> | > | You got all the fun training. I was all set to request transfer to
> the
> | > | Force Recon unit in Reno (my buddy had transferred there already
from
> my
> | > | unit and put in a good word for me with the CO) and go back for all
> the
> | > | infrantry training when the whole contract/knee issue came to a head
> for
> | > me.
> | > | Turned out for the best. Instead of going back for more training, I
> met
> | > my
> | > | (now) wife right after I was discharged.
> | > |
> | > | Jose
> | > |
> | > | "-=GriFter=-" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | > | news:[email protected]
> | > | > Our job identifiers were only 3 digits and anything after that
> | signified
> | > | any
> | > | > extra schooling that you had gone through. For example if I
remember
> | > right
> | > | > when I got out my MOS identifier was 11B-2PVWX........I think
those
> | are
> | > | > right.
> | > | >
> | > | > Here's what they stand for (if you care):
> | > | > 11B - Infantryman
> | > | > 2 - Had to do with rank e1-e4 was 1 and e4p-whatever was 2
> | > | > P - Airborne
> | > | > V - Ranger
> | > | > W - HALO
> | > | > X - SCUBA (Army not Navy SCUBA)---I don't remember if that was x
or
> z
> | > | >
> | > | > Anyway, that helps to describe how the Army's job identifier works
> and
> | > | than
> | > | > additional special quaification identifier. I'm sure there was
more
> | for
> | > | > other schools I went through but to tell you the truth I don't
> | remember
> | > | them
> | > | > all and I'm too lazy to dig out my 201 file.
> | > | >
> | > | > Sorry for nearly putting you to sleep, I know how exciting that
was.
> | > | > --
> | > | >
> | > | >
> | > | > -=GriFter=-
> | > | >
> | > | >
> | > | > "Jose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> | > | > news:[email protected]
> | > | > |
> | > | > | >
> | > | > | > The only real reason that I said anything to begin with is
just
> | that
> | > | I'm
> | > | > | > tired of people blaming the Army for their own mistaken career
> | > choice.
> | > | > | > --
> | > | > | >
> | > | > |
> | > | > -=GriFter=-
> | > | > | >
> | > | > | > "Smack a taser on his nuts until his pubes fall out!"
> | > | > | >
> | > | > |
> | > | > |
> | > | > | Agreed. You MUST be aware of what career path you want to take,
> or
> | > the
> | > | > path
> | > | > | of least resistance is likely to put you in the shittiest job.
> | > | > Re-classing
> | > | > | in the Corps is probably tougher because we are smaller and
always
> | get
> | > | > less
> | > | > | money than any other service. As such, getting a totally
> different
> | > | career
> | > | > | is tough. Sounds like EOD might be a variant of an 03XX career
> | path?
> | > | We
> | > | > | could lateral more easily, but going outside the MOS field was
> | tough.
> | > I
> | > | > | asked and was told that grunt classifications were easier to
> change
> | to
> | > | > than
> | > | > | anything fancy, like helo pilot.
> | > | > |
> | > | > | Jose
> | > | > |
> | > | > |
> | > | >
> | > | >
> | > |
> | > |
> | >
> | >
> |
> |
>
>




03 Jun 2004 22:47:02
ayar-15
Re: mechanics are good to have as friends


"Jose" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> And I'll bring the newcastle. :-P
>
> Jose
>



Mmmmmmm nut brown ale.