17 Jul 2004 01:09:52
Lee W
Starter Marker for use in the UK

Hi everyone,

I played my first day of paintball a couple of weeks back and have
really got the bug. I am looking for any suggestions people can make for
a good first marker which I am planning to get afer playing a few more
days (just to make sure).

To give some idea I live in the UK (anyone suggest good UK suppliers
other than holmbushpaintballshop.co.uk) and it seems most of the
paintball sites seem to use the beautiful english countryside for the
terrain as opposed to the bouncy-castle kind of things I see in all the
magazines (are they mostly tornaments ?).

In terms of the guns I have already looked at the Tippmann Custom 98 &
especially the A5 really appeal to me but I feel the 280-ish cost is a
bit much for a first gun.

Thanks in advance for any help

Regards

Lee


17 Jul 2004 06:21:11
MathU41
Re: Starter Marker for use in the UK

You're on the right track with Tippmans. 98's are a great first marker, and
A5's work the same, but have a really nice loader attatched. Tippmans last
forever and a week, so if you go with an A5, you'll never have to buy another
one unless you head on to the tournies.
A little cheaper, look at the PMI and Kingman line. My reccomendation would be
a base-line Pirahna or a Spyder X-Tra kit, since that comes with everything.
All the features on the high-end Spyders and such are nice, but it's better--in
my opinion, at least--to buy it at the bottom and mod it to your liking.


17 Jul 2004 14:26:29
Lee W
Re: Starter Marker for use in the UK

MathU41 wrote:

> You're on the right track with Tippmans. 98's are a great first marker, and
> A5's work the same, but have a really nice loader attatched. Tippmans last
> forever and a week, so if you go with an A5, you'll never have to buy another
> one unless you head on to the tournies.
> A little cheaper, look at the PMI and Kingman line. My reccomendation would be
> a base-line Pirahna or a Spyder X-Tra kit, since that comes with everything.
> All the features on the high-end Spyders and such are nice, but it's better--in
> my opinion, at least--to buy it at the bottom and mod it to your liking.

Thanks for the reply.

I certainly prefer the more traditional appearance of the Tippmanns and
the cyclone feeder looks impressive (not sure if I like the idea of
electronic hoppers as seen on other makes).

May be it is just the kid in me but the more realistic looks of the both
the A-5 and Custom 98 just grabbed my attention more than the more
sci-fi looking models. Does anyone else produce similarly
real-looker-like markers or is just Tippmann?

Also I meant to put this in my original query. What is the difference
between CO2 & Air systems? I was surprised to see that air is more
expensive than the CO2 models. Guess this is really showing how much of
a novice I am but would like to make the right choices.

Thanks again

Regards

Lee


17 Jul 2004 10:41:09
BillyJoeJimBob
Re: Starter Marker for use in the UK

Lee W wrote:
>
> Also I meant to put this in my original query. What is the
> difference between CO2 & Air systems? I was surprised to see that
> air is more expensive than the CO2 models. Guess this is really
> showing how much of a novice I am but would like to make the right
> choices.

CO2 is pressurized carbon dioxide gas. At the pressures inside a
CO2 tank, the carbon dioxide exists in both a liquid and a gas phase.
Depending on the temperature of the tank, there could be more or
less of the CO2 in it gaseous state. The physical properties of
CO2 are such that it is sensitive to temperature changes; on a cold
day the pressure in your tank may be 700 psi or less, while on a hot
summer day it might reach or exceed 1100 psi.

When a gas expands, it cools down. If you are firing rapidly, the
CO2 gas in the tank gets colder. As the temperature drops, the CO2
pressure inside the tank drops quickly and you will notice that your
shots begin to fall short of their target. It is for this reason that
CO2 yields a less consistent performance from shot to shot.

High pressure air (HPA) is, well, compressed air. An air cylinder is
pressurized to 3000 psi or higher. A pressure regulator on the
cylinder limits the output pressure to a range that is useable by
the paintgun. Air is much less sensitive than CO2 to temperature
changes, so one's shot-to-shot consistency is usually better.

CO2 tanks are inexpensive, and just about any field can fill them.
In the U.S., I can purchase a 50-pound bulk CO2 tank and perform my
own fills with relative ease.

HPA tanks are more expensive, and not all fields have the ability
to fill them. The equipment required to handle HPA is far more
expensive (3000 psi air compressors are not cheap). The higher
pressures and the pressure regulator on the tank is what makes HPA
more expensive.

On average, you will get around 10 shots per cubic inch of volume in
an HPA tank rated at 3000 psi. For a 4500 psi tank, you will get
around 15 shots per cubic inch of volume. For a CO2 tank you will
get somewhere around 50-70 shots per ounce of CO2, depending on your
marker and the weather.

If you are just starting out and are thinking of getting a Tippmann,
buy a CO2 tank. Tippmanns work fine on CO2. If you start firing
rapidly on a regular basis, you will then want to consider switching
to HPA, assuming your local field or paintball store can provide
fills.

BJJB


17 Jul 2004 15:29:05
Lee W
Re: Starter Marker for use in the UK

BillyJoeJimBob wrote:

<snip >

>
> CO2 is pressurized carbon dioxide gas. At the pressures inside a
> CO2 tank, the carbon dioxide exists in both a liquid and a gas phase.
> Depending on the temperature of the tank, there could be more or
> less of the CO2 in it gaseous state. The physical properties of
> CO2 are such that it is sensitive to temperature changes; on a cold
> day the pressure in your tank may be 700 psi or less, while on a hot
> summer day it might reach or exceed 1100 psi.
>
> When a gas expands, it cools down. If you are firing rapidly, the
> CO2 gas in the tank gets colder. As the temperature drops, the CO2
> pressure inside the tank drops quickly and you will notice that your
> shots begin to fall short of their target. It is for this reason that
> CO2 yields a less consistent performance from shot to shot.
>
> High pressure air (HPA) is, well, compressed air. An air cylinder is
> pressurized to 3000 psi or higher. A pressure regulator on the
> cylinder limits the output pressure to a range that is useable by
> the paintgun. Air is much less sensitive than CO2 to temperature
> changes, so one's shot-to-shot consistency is usually better.
>
> CO2 tanks are inexpensive, and just about any field can fill them.
> In the U.S., I can purchase a 50-pound bulk CO2 tank and perform my
> own fills with relative ease.
>
> HPA tanks are more expensive, and not all fields have the ability
> to fill them. The equipment required to handle HPA is far more
> expensive (3000 psi air compressors are not cheap). The higher
> pressures and the pressure regulator on the tank is what makes HPA
> more expensive.
>
> On average, you will get around 10 shots per cubic inch of volume in
> an HPA tank rated at 3000 psi. For a 4500 psi tank, you will get
> around 15 shots per cubic inch of volume. For a CO2 tank you will
> get somewhere around 50-70 shots per ounce of CO2, depending on your
> marker and the weather.
>
> If you are just starting out and are thinking of getting a Tippmann,
> buy a CO2 tank. Tippmanns work fine on CO2. If you start firing
> rapidly on a regular basis, you will then want to consider switching
> to HPA, assuming your local field or paintball store can provide
> fills.
>
> BJJB

Crikey. That was a very detailed response. Take it easy I'm still
learning, only joking.

I have been looking though the various UK online paintball shops and
they do sell regulators, are these then just for HPA rather than CO2.
Most of the time the descriptions aren't that detailed.

Can anyone suggest any good websites that cover these sorts of details
about the markers, I don't want to continue taking up peoples time on
this forum. My own searches haven't brought me many good results.

Thanks

Lee


17 Jul 2004 17:05:38
Phelps
Re: Starter Marker for use in the UK

In article <[email protected] >,
Lee W <[email protected] > wrote:

> I have been looking though the various UK online paintball shops and
> they do sell regulators, are these then just for HPA rather than CO2.
> Most of the time the descriptions aren't that detailed.

I think that almost any paintball regulator should handle CO2, but
some are better than others at it. The Gold Standard of CO2 regs is the
Plamer Stabalizer. It is priced reasonably in the US; I don't know if
you would be better off importing it directly from Palmer or trying to
find a local dealer.

http://www.palmer-pursuit.com/online-catalog/stabilizer.htm

--
Phelps <http://www.donotremove.netcolor=#0000FF> >
"Bury me with all my stuff, because you know that it is mine."
-- Master Shake's Suicide Note, "Aqua Teen Hunger Force"


18 Jul 2004 15:13:08
LCT Paintball
Re: Starter Marker for use in the UK

There is some benefit to a regulator for CO2 if your marker will fire
properly at 500 psi or lower.
Check out www.warpig.com for al the info you can digest.


--
"Don't be misled, bad company corrupts good character."
www.LCTPaintball.com
www.LCTProducts.com


"Lee W" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> BillyJoeJimBob wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
> >
> > CO2 is pressurized carbon dioxide gas. At the pressures inside a
> > CO2 tank, the carbon dioxide exists in both a liquid and a gas phase.
> > Depending on the temperature of the tank, there could be more or
> > less of the CO2 in it gaseous state. The physical properties of
> > CO2 are such that it is sensitive to temperature changes; on a cold
> > day the pressure in your tank may be 700 psi or less, while on a hot
> > summer day it might reach or exceed 1100 psi.
> >
> > When a gas expands, it cools down. If you are firing rapidly, the
> > CO2 gas in the tank gets colder. As the temperature drops, the CO2
> > pressure inside the tank drops quickly and you will notice that your
> > shots begin to fall short of their target. It is for this reason that
> > CO2 yields a less consistent performance from shot to shot.
> >
> > High pressure air (HPA) is, well, compressed air. An air cylinder is
> > pressurized to 3000 psi or higher. A pressure regulator on the
> > cylinder limits the output pressure to a range that is useable by
> > the paintgun. Air is much less sensitive than CO2 to temperature
> > changes, so one's shot-to-shot consistency is usually better.
> >
> > CO2 tanks are inexpensive, and just about any field can fill them.
> > In the U.S., I can purchase a 50-pound bulk CO2 tank and perform my
> > own fills with relative ease.
> >
> > HPA tanks are more expensive, and not all fields have the ability
> > to fill them. The equipment required to handle HPA is far more
> > expensive (3000 psi air compressors are not cheap). The higher
> > pressures and the pressure regulator on the tank is what makes HPA
> > more expensive.
> >
> > On average, you will get around 10 shots per cubic inch of volume in
> > an HPA tank rated at 3000 psi. For a 4500 psi tank, you will get
> > around 15 shots per cubic inch of volume. For a CO2 tank you will
> > get somewhere around 50-70 shots per ounce of CO2, depending on your
> > marker and the weather.
> >
> > If you are just starting out and are thinking of getting a Tippmann,
> > buy a CO2 tank. Tippmanns work fine on CO2. If you start firing
> > rapidly on a regular basis, you will then want to consider switching
> > to HPA, assuming your local field or paintball store can provide
> > fills.
> >
> > BJJB
>
> Crikey. That was a very detailed response. Take it easy I'm still
> learning, only joking.
>
> I have been looking though the various UK online paintball shops and
> they do sell regulators, are these then just for HPA rather than CO2.
> Most of the time the descriptions aren't that detailed.
>
> Can anyone suggest any good websites that cover these sorts of details
> about the markers, I don't want to continue taking up peoples time on
> this forum. My own searches haven't brought me many good results.
>
> Thanks
>
> Lee




20 Jul 2004 13:51:15
Derek Beaumont
Re: Starter Marker for use in the UK

Hiya,

Here's a few links to shops in the UK.

www.planeteclipse.com
www.fatbobspaintball.co.uk
www.p8ntonline.com (phoenix paintball)
www.justpaintball.co.uk

I've used these and had no problems with any of them (in fact Planet Eclipse
& Phoenix have both given exceptional help when needed).

Regards

Deker

www.darlington-mavericks.com
deker AT darlington-mavericks DOT com



"Lee W" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:A%[email protected]
> Hi everyone,
>
> I played my first day of paintball a couple of weeks back and have
> really got the bug. I am looking for any suggestions people can make for
> a good first marker which I am planning to get afer playing a few more
> days (just to make sure).
>
> To give some idea I live in the UK (anyone suggest good UK suppliers
> other than holmbushpaintballshop.co.uk) and it seems most of the
> paintball sites seem to use the beautiful english countryside for the
> terrain as opposed to the bouncy-castle kind of things I see in all the
> magazines (are they mostly tornaments ?).
>
> In terms of the guns I have already looked at the Tippmann Custom 98 &
> especially the A5 really appeal to me but I feel the 280-ish cost is a
> bit much for a first gun.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help
>
> Regards
>
> Lee




20 Jul 2004 22:38:37
Lee W
Re: Starter Marker for use in the UK

Derek Beaumont wrote:

> Hiya,
>
> Here's a few links to shops in the UK.
>
> www.planeteclipse.com
> www.fatbobspaintball.co.uk
> www.p8ntonline.com (phoenix paintball)
> www.justpaintball.co.uk
>
> I've used these and had no problems with any of them (in fact Planet Eclipse
> & Phoenix have both given exceptional help when needed).
>
> Regards
>
> Deker
>
> www.darlington-mavericks.com
> deker AT darlington-mavericks DOT com
>

Deker,

Thanks. Thats a few more links for the favorites.

Regards

Lee